FixMeStick virus detection software runs from USB stick

Equipped with its own operating system, a gadget like FixMeStick can be a lifesaver

 FixMeStick virusEDMONTON, Alta. Dec. 20, 2016/ Troy Media/ – It’s imperative that you use software to protect your computer against viruses, spyware, malware, trojans and other threats. Unlike the human body, where vaccines or treatments can take effect while you’re asleep or awake, some computer nasties can’t be detected or eradicated if an infection is active, or while the computer is running. It could be compared to trying to diagnose an issue with your car, and then attempting to fix it while driving.

Equipped with its own operating system, a gadget like FixMeStick can be a lifesaver. It’s a self-propelled, self-contained, hardware-based 
virus removal system that runs directly from a USB stick. Plus, it’s a Canadian company of the same name that is based in Montreal.

It’s a handy device, as you can clean up your own PC and, possibly, save yourself a trip to a service department. There’s no software to install. You simply insert the stick into one of your USB ports of your PC (or Mac), and double-click the FixMeStick icon. Your computer will restart itself, and load the FixMeStick operating system, instead of your computer’s, making threat detection and removal a whole lot easier.

“Essentially every computer in 
the world is running an anti-virus program, but infections remain widespread because the volume and sophistication of viruses is continually increasing,” says Marty Algire, FixMeStick CEO and co-founder.

To help increase the probability of detecting potential threats, FixMeStick uses a multi-scanning method. This means it uses more than one source of (known) virus definitions, allowing it to cast a wider net to identify known threats. In fact, it licenses those definitions and full dictionaries from Kaspersky, Sophos and Avira, three well-known leaders in the anti-viral industry.

Although occurrences are less frequent, the Apple Macintosh is 
not immune to malicious threats. 
For Mac users, FixMeStick Mac will soon be released, and will utilize the same three virus engines as the PC version. Due to the nature of the Mac, this version boots, or starts, from a powered-off Mac computer.

FixMeStick is designed to keep itself up to date with both software enhancements and new virus definitions.

Currently, FixMeStick is most effective on PCs and Macs, and isn’t intended for smartphones and tablets. Also, it doesn’t replace your current active software. Instead, 
it enhances it to help keep your computer healthy.

FixMeStick sells for $59.95 
and is available at major retailers, like London Drugs and Best Buy, and at [popup url=”http://FixMeStick.com” height=”1000″ width=”1200″ scrollbars=”1″]FixMeStick.com[/popup]. The price includes a one- year subscription that takes affect when you first use it, as well as free phone support and a license for an unlimited number of scans for up to three computers. The device, itself, also has a lifetime warranty.

It’s interesting to note that FixMeStick gained notoriety when Marty Algire appeared on CBC’s Dragon’s Den, along with co-founder Corey Velan, approximately three years ago. The duo asked for $500,000 for 20 per cent. Arlene Dickinson
 and David Chilton bought in on the final deal. Once the dust settled after the show’s taping, a third Dragon, Bruce Coxon, also came on board. According to Algire, the deal evolved. “We removed the equity agreement in exchange for a royalty agreement.”

As long as you keep your subscription current, you never have to buy a new version of FixMeStick. It’s designed to keep itself up-to-date with both software enhancements and new virus definitions – which, in this changing technological world, is imperative.

Greg Gazin a.k.a “The Gadget Guy” and “Gadget Greg”, Senior Editor at Troy Media, is a syndicated veteran tech columnist, small business and technology speaker, blogger, podcaster (host and producer) and author. Greg can be reached at @gadgetgreg or at GadgetGuy.ca. (This article also appears in the Jan-Feb 2017 issue of  [popup url=”http://digital.active-life.ca/2017/January_February/?16″ height=”1000″ width=”1200″ scrollbars=”1″]Active Life[/popup] magazine).

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