Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study

Gap is closing, but U of A researchers find women are still given fewer tests and medications, and are less likely to see a specialist

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: studyWomen face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers. “The women were on average a decade older than men at the time of their first heart attack and they more…

Li Ka Shing Applied Virology Institute gets $20M in funding

Research hub gains significant provincial support to accelerate research and commercialization of antiviral drugs and vaccines

Li Ka Shing Applied Virology Institute gets $20M in fundingThe government of Alberta signalled its support for the University of Alberta’s leadership in Alberta’s biotech sector by announcing $20 million in new funding for the U of A’s Li Ka Shing Applied Virology Institute (AVI) during a celebration of Michael Houghton’s Nobel Prize. This builds on the more than $30 million the government has…

Our close bond with dogs has a long history, study shows

Dogs were certainly useful but 'people clearly had emotional attachments to their dogs from the very beginning’

Our close bond with dogs has a long history, study showsThe close bond between humans and dogs stretches back into the last ice age, according to new international research involving a University of Alberta archeologist. Genetic analysis of the remains of 27 ancient dogs shows that at least five major ancestry lineages had diversified by 11,000 years ago, “demonstrating a deep genetic history of dogs…

Atwood’s childhood works reveals early glimmers of creativity

Compilation of juvenilia hints at the famed author’s first influences – and a characteristic sense of humour, say U of A experts

Margaret Atwood was only seven when she got her first bitter taste of literary rejection. She wrote a play called The Giant, the Gost (sic) and the Moon and staged it with paper puppets and a cardboard set. It conveyed the weighty themes of lying, crime and punishment, “as befits a future novelist,” recalls the…

Nobel Prize winner inspires researchers to ask the big questions

Michael Houghton's colleagues talk about the power of collaboration to help fight viruses that plague the world

Nobel Prize winner inspires researchers to ask the big questionsIt was a chance conversation with a colleague in chemistry that led University of Alberta virologist Maya Shmulevitz to the glow-in-the-dark eel protein, a discovery that’s advancing cancer therapy in a new way. It’s common practice for researchers to use fluorescent proteins to track how viruses behave inside a cell. But the usual proteins are too…

Alberta sees a record number of preventable syphilis infections

Alberta sees a record number of preventable syphilis infectionsA University of Alberta clinical trial will screen 1,500 people with point-of-care dual HIV and syphilis test kits in an effort to combat the syphilis outbreak in Edmonton and northern Alberta. Alberta Health Services declared the outbreak last year after 12 stillborn births and 1,753 newly diagnosed cases of syphilis, 68 per cent of them in the Edmonton area.…

Building quality of life into spaces for people with ‘invisible’ disabilities

Ensuring physical accessibility is only the beginning of creating places where people can ‘be who they are,’ says design consultant and PhD student Lara Pinchbeck

Building quality of life into spaces for people with ‘invisible’ disabilitiesWhen designing spaces for people living with disabilities, there’s more to consider than whether they’re physically accessible. A greater challenge is making sure the environments we work and live in accommodate ‘invisible’ or ‘hidden’ disabilities – a long list of conditions that range from hearing impairment to autism to anxiety disorders. Understanding the space requirements of…

Mentoring helps entrepreneurs navigate the unknowns

Guiding researchers and scientists to commercialize their intellectual property

Mentoring helps entrepreneurs navigate the unknownsA little more than 20 years ago, MIT developed a mentorship program that challenged notions about competition in the world of business. They called on local titans of business to volunteer to guide the school’s researchers and scientists in commercializing their intellectual property. Within a decade, this in-house service was drawing so much praise from schools around…

How baby’s first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brain

Discovery may help explain cases of sudden infant death syndrome

How baby’s first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brainAt the moment of birth, the essential role of delivering life-saving oxygen to the baby switches from mom and her placenta to the baby’s lungs and brain. That the timing of this happens so precisely is miraculous, but how it happens remains largely a mystery. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, in…
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