Food industry demonstrates willingness to adapt to changing markets

Should be lauded for building partnerships that work for all, especially for consumers

Food industry demonstrates willingness to adapt to changing marketsThe food industry is showing signs it can change, and the timing couldn't be better. Animal proteins have been a dietary mainstay in much of the western world for thousands of years. But demand for processed and red meats has been declining for a number of years now, for a variety of reasons. The arguments against animal protein consumption…

Liberals won a precarious majority

Received lowest percentage of votes to win the largest percentage of seats since 1867

Liberals won a precarious majorityYou wouldn’t know it from the headlines, but the federal Liberals just received the lowest percentage of votes to win the largest percentage of seats since 1867 – 54.4 per cent of the seats with just 39.5 per cent voter support. As a result, the Liberals should act like they are fully aware their minority…

First Nations education funding comparable to public school funding

So why do less than 40% of students on First Nations reserves graduate?

First Nations education funding comparable to public school fundingFirst Nations education is a hot topic. With graduation rates on First Nations reserves below 40 per cent (compared to graduation rates above 80 per cent for all other Canadian students), the issue deserves ample attention from Canadians and the newly elected federal government. Unfortunately, discussions about First Nations education often solely focus on funding…

2015 election came down to the politics of resentment

Fear and loathing of Harper trumped fear of leaving the country hostage to profound inexperience

2015 election came down to the politics of resentmentLast week, several colleagues at the University undertook a post mortem of the federal election. Two of our recent PhD graduates, David Coletto (2010), now CEO of Abacus Data, and Paul Fairie (2013), a principal with Centrality Data Science, provided a fine-grained analysis of what had been a two-part campaign. Part one, Canadians decided that…

Battle of Agincourt one of the most famous battles in history

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers"

Battle of Agincourt one of the most famous battles in historyWe few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he today that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition; And gentlemen in England now-a-bed Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That…

When it comes to pharmacare, be careful what you wish for

Provincial governments are more interested in restricting access than in creating better programs

When it comes to pharmacare, be careful what you wish forAlmost 60 per cent of respondents to a recent poll thought that a national Pharmacare program would be good for Canadians. National Pharmacare appears to be regarded by many as a panacea for the woes of the present hodgepodge of provincial drug plans, but some provinces seem to view it as an opportunity to alleviate…

Canada counting on US consumer for economic growth

How Canada fares in 2016-17 will hinge, in large part, on developments in the United States

Canada counting on US consumer for economic growthAs Justin Trudeau and his euphoric Liberal colleagues get ready to form a new government in Ottawa, they have reason to worry about the macroeconomic picture. But good news south of the border could have a ripple effect in Canada. In recent weeks, several forecasters, including the Bank of Canada, have (again) downgraded their growth…

Twilight of the baby boomers

With the rise of the new generation, the boomers are finally the ones on the outside looking in

Twilight of the baby boomersThe unthinkable has happened: in two successive Canadian elections, unproven and much younger left-leaning political neophytes have electorally swamped conservative parties possessing skilled and experienced leaders. It was more than a fluke. It’s a changing of the guard that signals the political twilight for a generation of Baby Boomers who suddenly seem old and out…

Raising taxes not a guarantee of higher revenues

Governments often fail to account for the behavioural effects spurred by its personal income tax rate hikes

Raising taxes not a guarantee of higher revenuesBy Steve Lafleur and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute The Alberta government recently abandoned the province’s single 10 per cent tax rate on personal income in favour of a five-bracket system with a top rate of 15 per cent – a move that will reduce Alberta’s competitiveness and cause undue harm on an already struggling…

Five reasons why Canadians should thank Stephen Harper

He also provided a clear reminder that the price of democracy is eternal vigilance

Five reasons why Canadians should thank Stephen HarperThe predictable post-election criticism of Stephen Harper — even from within his Conservative caucus — fails to acknowledge that we have much to thank the soon-to-be former prime minister for. Yes, losing the Oct. 19 federal election should rest on the shoulders of Harper and a decade of government decisions. But many Canadians are thankful for the outcome,…