B.C. needs to pull out of its debt spiral

Premier Horgan really needs to start getting his spending under control

B.C. needs to pull out of its debt spiralThe interest payments on British Columbia’s provincial debt this year could pay the salaries of 4,600 new paramedics for 10 years. But, instead of paying for first responders or providing tax relief to families, a whopping $2.8 billion is being sent to bondholders on Bay Street and Wall Street every year to pay for our…

B.C. drivers burned by highest gas taxes in Canada

It costs about $50 extra in taxes to fill up a minivan in Metro Vancouver, not including the cost of the fuel

B.C. drivers burned by highest gas taxes in CanadaAs we see the light at the end of the COVID Tunnel of Hell, many families hope to hit the roads to explore beautiful British Columbia this summer. Safe road trips will be essential after the strain many have been under during the pandemic. But, because B.C. drivers are being burned by the highest gas…

Democracies can’t abandon oil and gas production

We have to beware tyrannies and autocracies that use oil and natural gas as weapons

Democracies can’t abandon oil and gas productionBy Mark Milke and Lennie Kaplan Canadian Energy Centre History shows tyrannies and autocracies use oil and natural gas as weapons when interacting with democracies. This is obvious during wars – tanks and jets don’t run on vegetable oil – as well as peacetime. For example, in 2009, Russia cut natural gas supplies to Ukraine in…

B.C. can’t keep spending like there’s no tomorrow

The Horgan government says that by 2024, it’s going to be $127 billion. That’s an increase of 45 per cent in three years

B.C. can’t keep spending like there’s no tomorrowThe sun will come out tomorrow and we need to start acting like it. Politicians keep telling us that we need to buckle up while they overspend like there’s no future, but, when we finally emerge from the COVID Tunnel of Hell, taxpayers can’t afford for governments to keep spending our bottom dollars. Premier John…

B.C. budget must be prudent

Provincial debt is more than $75 billion, and it’s increasing by $100 per second

B.C. budget must be prudentBritish Columbia’s last budget feels like something from a distant, pre-pandemic past. Now the province’s throne speech gives a little glance into the future budget. And if we’re going to get back to balanced budgets, we’re going to have to go faster than Marty McFly to fix our finances in the future. Back in the…

Alaskan campaign could kill B.C. cruise industry

The state wants non-U.S. cruise ships to be allowed to go straight from continental U.S. ports to Alaska, cutting out B.C. entirely

Alaskan campaign could kill B.C. cruise industryYou may think British Columbia has a cruise ship industry because of our great location, marvellous climate and amazing attractions, natural or otherwise. You would be wrong. We have a cruise industry here because of actions by the United States 114 years ago to put America first. The U.S. wanted to ensure that it had…

Carbon tax will cost British Columbians more

Think you can avoid the carbon tax by riding your bike? Think again

Carbon tax will cost British Columbians moreBritish Columbians are now paying even more to heat, eat and drive to work. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's most recent carbon tax hike has found a willing follower in British Columbia Premier John Horgan. When Team Trudeau was fighting against several provinces at the Supreme Court of Canada, saying he should be able to impose…

Study hopes to find ways to contain spread of mountain pine beetles

Mountain pine beetles can be an important contributor to forest health, but ...

Study hopes to find ways to contain spread of mountain pine beetlesIn a new study aimed at assisting efforts to contain the destructive spread of mountain pine beetles, University of Alberta biologists examined their flight techniques and used genetic information to track how they are spreading through the province. “One of the reasons these beetles have become such a problem is because of the difficulty in…

Policy uncertainty continues to hurt Canada’s mining industry

To attract the investment required to develop resources, mitigating the risks of policy uncertainly needs to be a top priority

Policy uncertainty continues to hurt Canada’s mining industryBy Jairo Yunis and Elmira Aliakbari The Fraser Institute The COVID recession has hurt Canada’s natural resources sector, with supply disruptions, commodity price declines and greater uncertainty regarding future demand. Not surprisingly, capital investment in the Canadian mining industry has dropped to its lowest level since 2009. Of course, business investment should be a key…

How much First Nations business comes from government?

The Yukon government recently unveiled a procurement policy that offers a roadmap for Canadian jurisdictions like B.C.

How much First Nations business comes from government?The Business Council of British Columbia sees “a generational opportunity to accelerate and realize a new future where Indigenous communities and businesses are equitably participating in B.C.’s open trading economy.” And Kim Baird, a First Nations leader and advocate, says: “From resource extraction projects on First Nation traditional territories to First Nations developing their reserve…
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