Stick to the facts to protect old-growth forests in B.C.

Debate on Vancouver Island’s old growth forests must be based on facts, not just conjuring up feelings of nostalgia, awe and respect

Stick to the facts to protect old-growth forests in B.C.By Mike Larock and Megan Hanacek Association of BC Forest Professionals Forest professionals believe that British Columbia’s old forests are important. Old forests are ecological reservoirs of genetic variation, a record of ecological history, habitat for specialized species or predators, recreation inspirations and complex buffers to change. That’s why when it comes to managing B.C.…

Serving up an unpalatable business model

Restaurants are struggling to find staff and keep profit margins healthy. But automation and careful management can help

Serving up an unpalatable business modelIf you’re going to a restaurant, don’t go hungry. Just about every coffee shop and eating establishment in and around Vancouver has a Help Wanted sign. They could be short of servers, which means it will be a while before anyone even takes your order. The kitchen could also be understaffed, so your meal isn’t…

New NDP government puts B.C. finances back on shaky ground

The B.C. government has sent a troubling signal that big spending, tax increases and deficits are back as the prevailing fiscal policies

New NDP government puts B.C. finances back on shaky groundBy Jason Clemens and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute During the spring 2017 election campaign, John Horgan convinced many British Columbians that his NDP government would be different than the previous New Democratic regime, particularly when it came to the province’s finances. Unfortunately, the first few months of NDP reign don’t augur well for the…

Big spending, big problems on the horizon for B.C. government

Despite the promise of yet more new programs to come, there’s actually little room in the budget for more spending

Big spending, big problems on the horizon for B.C. governmentBy Charles Lammam and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute British Columbia’s new government has tabled its first budget, proposing to ramp up spending and shrink last year’s $2.7-billion surplus to almost zero, despite enacting a host of economically-damaging tax increases that the NDP campaigned on. And the budget does’t include everything the New Democrats promised during the…

B.C. budget abandons any hope for efficient carbon tax

Subsidizing green projects with revenue from carbon taxes may be politically popular but it’s fundamentally misguided policy

B.C. budget abandons any hope for efficient carbon taxBy Kenneth P. Green, Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute In its first budget, B.C. Premier John Horgan’s government recently said it would raise the carbon tax rate by 66 per cent over the next four years. And it rejected revenue neutrality, undermining the case for an economically efficient carbon tax. British Columbia’s…

B.C.’s new government heads for a familiar debt trap

The New Democrats offer up a significant and impressive list of expenditures, with no clear plan how it will pay for them

B.C.’s new government heads for a familiar debt trapBritish Columbia’s NDP government has just treated residents to its first throne speech, followed by an interim budget to carry it through until February, which is the usual month for annual budgets. Looking at all the good things being promised, the budget makes one think of Christmas in September. The new government is being bountiful,…

B.C.’s new business as usual: political and economic uncertainty

NDP election win prompts waves of uncertainty that threaten investment and economic growth in B.C.

B.C.’s new business as usual: political and economic uncertaintyA shadow hangs over British Columbia’s political and economic future. Last spring, B.C. went through one of its most tumultuous and uncertain elections in years. No party received the majority of seats in the May 9 election, creating a hung legislature and political uncertainty. And there was the uncertainty regarding who the Green Party would…

The unintended, and painful, consequences of a $15 minimum wage

A government-mandated increase in the price of low-skilled labour tends to lead employers to reduce their labour force

The unintended, and painful, consequences of a $15 minimum wageBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute It seems obvious: if you want to give low-wage workers a raise, increase the minimum wage. But raising minimum wage produces unintended consequences that hurt many of the people it’s supposed to help. B.C.’s new government recently promised to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2021,…

The search for Trans Mountain’s 15,000 construction jobs

Why would elected officials promote a construction jobs figure six times Kinder Morgan’s actual number?

The search for Trans Mountain’s 15,000 construction jobsWhen Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, he said it “will create 15,000 new, middle class jobs – the majority of them in the trades.” Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr repeatedly points to this figure to justify the federal government’s approval. He says, “the project is expected to…

Should equalization really grow forever?

A rule requiring payments to grow – no matter what the circumstances – can only exacerbate regional friction

Should equalization really grow forever?  By Ben Eisen and Joel Emes The Fraser Institute The relative economic strength of Canada’s provinces has shifted in recent years, as former powerhouses struggle while former laggards improve. The nation’s equalization program is not equipped to respond fairly to these developments. In the past two fiscal years, Quebec has collected more revenue from natural…