Blame the parents for suffering of children on the margins

Developmentally delayed children come into a failing welfare system due to irresponsible parents placing substance abuse ahead of their children

Blame the parents for suffering of children on the marginsMore than half of Winnipeg’s Indigenous homeless population are former wards of Child and Family Services (CFS). A former CFS ward explained on CBC recently that the 50 per cent figure was too low, not taking into account the significant number of former wards who “couch surf.” This group relies on the kindness of acquaintances…

Indigenous child welfare system remains dysfunctional

Decades after the ’60s Scoop, we're no closer to a successful model to help children from troubled homes

The ’60s Scoop is back in the news again. And we're no closer to a solution to a problem that has plagued the nation for generations. The federal government has set aside $875 million for Indigenous adults who were adopted into non-Indigenous homes in the 1960s, ’70s and early ’80s. Those who accept the money…

Indigenous children continue to pay a steep price

No amount of funding plans or reorganization can solve this problem as long as alcohol and drug abuse persists in First Nations communities

Indigenous children continue to pay a steep priceWe want simple answers. But, sometimes, there aren’t any. Take Manitoba’s child welfare system, for example. We want to find a solution to a problem that has plagued us for generations: What to do about the huge numbers of Indigenous children taken into the care of child welfare agencies each year? Meetings are held in…

The silence over Indigenous woes is deafening

You can’t solve problems that can’t be discussed, yet we refuse to have frank and open discussions about a very real crisis

The silence over Indigenous woes is deafeningThe controversy over comments made by Sen. Lynn Beyak illustrates that it’s virtually impossible to openly discuss Canada’s most important domestic issue: the chronic problems of poverty and unemployment in Indigenous communities. People who disagree with claims that the problem stems from Indigenous victimization – colonialism, bad governmental policy, discrimination, residential schools and the like…

Ripples from ’60s Indigenous children Scoop continue

If governments hadn’t protected Indigenous children, they would have faced lawsuits for failure to honour their commitments to those children

Ripples from ’60s Indigenous children Scoop continueThe Alberta government is working with the ’60s Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta to hold “engagement” sessions with Indigenous adults who were placed as children in non-Indigenous homes. It seems likely that after an apology is officially made, discussions will immediately turn to compensation. The federal government established a precedent by apologizing and announcing monetary…