The rise of the conscious (and often reluctant) carnivore

The meat industry must adapt as a growing number of consumers look for protein from a variety of sources

The rise of the conscious (and often reluctant) carnivoreCanadians are enjoying summer picnics and barbecues, and meat often plays a central role in the menu. But eating meat is becoming increasingly controversial, as is selling it. In foie gras-friendly France, a number of anti-meat incidents have been reported. In recent weeks, several butcher shops and slaughterhouses were sprayed with fake blood. Other protesters…

Canada’s new Healthy Eating Strategy will pay huge dividends

Proposed new Food Guide and nutrition labelling policies are crucial to helping Canadians achieve better health

Canada’s new Healthy Eating Strategy will pay huge dividendsThe long process of updating Canada’s Food Guide and reforming nutrition labelling will soon become a reality. And that’s good news. Collectively called Canada’s Healthy Eating Strategy, the proposals by Health Canada have been open to public consultation – and, unfortunately, industry lobbying. No one is arguing with the rights of all Canadians to be…

Put down the tech, pick up a sandwich and eat with others

People function best when they drop the hyper-productivity mindset and take work breaks to eat together

Put down the tech, pick up a sandwich and eat with othersHumans are a special bunch – or at least we like to think we are. The truth is, our ‘success’ as a species, us big-brained, upright walking apes, isn’t all that unique. In fact, the success of all species comes down to a single shared evolved adaptation: the ability to convert organic material into energy.…

Jiminy Crickets! The truth about bugs as food

Loblaw selling cricket flour under its precious President’s Choice label is a big deal. But in a lot of ways, it makes a great deal of sense

Jiminy Crickets! The truth about bugs as foodSelling cricket flour is a sign that the protein wars in Canada have reached a new level. Loblaw, the largest food distribution company in the country, is now selling cricket flour. The product isn’t new – speciality stores have been selling it for a few years. But Loblaw is the first major retailer to sell…

A meatless Canada? No, but we’re becoming more discerning

A recent poll by Dalhousie University suggests that our food choices are becoming more varied

A meatless Canada? No, but we’re becoming more discerningCanadians love meat but other sources of protein are emerging as potent alternatives. Demand is up for vegetable proteins like pulses, as well as for fish and seafood. Loblaw has even started selling cricket flour and is trying to make insect consumption mainstream. That’s led some people to believe that vegetarian and vegan segments of the…

Eat more plants, less meat – improve your health and save the planet

Canada’s Food Guide revamp is good for people and the planet, thanks in great part to a new information-gathering process

Eat more plants, less meat – improve your health and save the planetBy Courtney Howard Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment and Ian Culbert Canadian Public Health Association What is a healthy diet? New Year’s diet conversations still abound around water coolers Canada-wide as people debate the merits and shortcomings of sugar, gluten, meat, dairy, tofu and other edibles. Scientific articles, shiny celebrities and representatives of…

Taxing meat is an unpalatable proposition

Arguing that meat is the new tobacco is sensationalist nonsense, since tobacco is not essential to life and food is. Let the market evolve

Taxing meat is an unpalatable propositionImposing a sin tax on foods that are deemed environmentally detrimental seems to be gaining support. But little can be accomplished by taxing meat. For some, eating meat is considered a sin and therefore meat products should be taxed, like alcohol and tobacco. A new report published recently by a group called Farm Animal Investment Risk…

A Canadian delicacy claws its way back into the market

Lobster is so popular these days, McDonald's ditched its McLobster due to higher prices. Still, things are looking up for the 'chicken of the sea'

A Canadian delicacy claws its way back into the marketLobsters are not easy on the eyes. The first person to discover that these hideous crustaceans were edible deserves a medal. Lobster was once the poor man’s protein and fed mainly to prisoners. These days, the chicken of the sea is enjoying more love than ever – U.S. President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel…

Guiding Canada down a multicultural food path, with consequences

The next food guide will make the disconnect between Canadian agricultural policies and food consumption much more obvious

Guiding Canada down a multicultural food path, with consequencesThe new principles Health Canada will use for its next food guide signal a complete revamp of our rainbow of food groups. It appears a plant-based diet will be strongly encouraged. We might even see a focus on more plant-based proteins like beans, lentils, nuts and tofu in the next Canada’s Food Guide. This would…

Generation X the lost food generation

Generation Xers grew up in an era when food was functional and boring. As a result, many don't cook and have little interest in the culinary culture

Generation X the lost food generationGeneration Xers don’t cook. They never acquired the skills. Most of this group (born between 1965 and 1976) grew up when food was essentially an afterthought. Different generations have different relationships with food and cooking. Recent studies show that baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) have time to cook and most do. Millennials (born between 1977…
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