New self-assessment tool helps pregnant women exercise safely

New self-assessment tool helps pregnant women exercise safelyPregnant women can now easily and quickly determine whether they should be exercising, thanks to a new one-of-a-kind tool developed in collaboration with researchers at the University of Alberta. The Get Active Questionnaire for Pregnancy, newly published by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, guides pregnant individuals through a series of yes/no questions to confirm…

Regular exercise may help expecting moms stave off depression

Study suggests following physical activity guidelines could help a vulnerable group that is bearing the brunt of social isolation

Regular exercise may help expecting moms stave off depressionNew moms and pregnant mothers-to-be who were physically active in the early days of the pandemic had a 30 per cent less chance of experiencing depression, according to a study that also shows this already vulnerable group continues to bear the brunt of the isolation measures. “It’s not like it was a big shock that…

Pushing boundaries so women don’t have to ‘suffer in silence’

In honour of International Women’s Day, we celebrate three research-focused clinicians who are improving women’s health

Pushing boundaries so women don’t have to ‘suffer in silence’As the world marks International Women’s Day, we celebrate the scientists who are working to improve women’s health. More than 140 researchers are working on women, children’s and perinatal medicine through the Women and Children's Health Research Institute (WCHRI) at the University of Alberta, supported by the Alberta Women’s Health Foundation and the Stollery Children’s Foundation.…

Initiative to raise awareness of women’s health research launched

Women’s Health Collective Canada will support research to fill knowledge gaps and meet women’s unique health needs, along with educating

Initiative to raise awareness of women’s health research launchedWomen make up roughly half the population and have given birth to everyone, yet have remained largely excluded from medical research and drug trials, according to Sharlene Rutherford, president and CEO of the Royal Alexandra Hospital Foundation (RAHF). “We know it can take 17 years for medical research to filter down to clinical practice, and women…

Wear Red Day warns women about risks of heart attack and stroke

To be held on Feb. 13, its goal is to arm women with knowledge and questions to ask their doctors

Wear Red Day warns women about risks of heart attack and strokeDid you know that heart attack and stroke represent the leading cause of premature death for women in Canada? Or that Canadian women are five times more likely to die of heart disease than breast cancer? Or that 53 per cent of women who have heart attack symptoms go undiagnosed when they seek medical treatment?…

New way identified to prevent breast cancer cells from evading therapy

Inhibiting the process that causes resistance in these cells improves the efficacy of immunotherapy, could mean better outcomes

New way identified to prevent breast cancer cells from evading therapyNew research at the University of Alberta has revealed a way to increase the sensitivity to immunotherapy of a rare type of cells within a tumour that are responsible for treatment resistance and breast cancer progression. The study, recently published in the journal Cancer Letters, could pave the way to better treatment outcomes for patients. The researchers…

How student athletes stay mentally healthy

Study of female varsity athletes suggests they look after their mental health before, during and after the sports season

How student athletes stay mentally healthyWomen varsity athletes who flourish during the season invest heavily in their mental health in the off-season, according to a University of Alberta study aimed at creating tools to help athletes maintain a healthy mental outlook as they navigate the ebbs and flows of a school year. “Athletes do struggle with mental illness and we don’t really…

Women less likely to die from COVID-19 than men

Hormones, chromosomes contribute to stronger immune response and better outcomes for female COVID-19 patients

Women less likely to die from COVID-19 than menFemale COVID-19 patients face less severe disease complications and a lower risk of dying than male patients thanks to hormones and chromosomes that contribute to a stronger immune response, according to new research from a University of Alberta-led team. “The highlight of our study is how the sex differences in COVID-19 are linked to ACE2,” said senior…

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study

Gap is closing, but U of A researchers find women are still given fewer tests and medications, and are less likely to see a specialist

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: studyWomen face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers. “The women were on average a decade older than men at the time of their first heart attack and they more…

Worse birth outcomes, higher pregnancy risk in poorest rural regions

Alberta researchers identify gradients of risk for preterm births, small and large size at birth, smoking and drug use by mothers

Worse birth outcomes, higher pregnancy risk in poorest rural regionsThe highest concentration of adverse birth outcomes and related maternal risk factors occur in rural areas of Alberta with the lowest socio-economic status, according to new research from the University of Alberta. “When it comes to perinatal health, postal code can be as important as your genetic code,” said perinatal epidemiologist Maria-Beatriz Ospina, assistant professor of obstetrics…
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