B.C.’s ride-sharing red tape hurts consumers

The government is trampling on the rights of ride-sharing businesses and their potential customers

B.C.’s ride-sharing red tape hurts consumersMany British Columbians want rides from Point A to Point B and will pay somebody to drive them. Others have access to cars and want to earn money giving people rides. But the provincial government is preventing these mutually beneficial exchanges. The governing New Democrats promised during the 2017 election campaign that British Columbians would…

B.C. government should get out of the insurance business

ICBC represents an asset to the provincial government, which faces deficit problems

B.C. government should get out of the insurance businessBy Ian Madsen and Anderson Agbugba Frontier Centre for Public Policy The Insurance Corp. of British Columbia (ICBC) has recently suffered significant losses. These losses have been offset by transfers from its optimal business. But without transfers, the basic business capital would have fallen below the regulatory minimum. Even worse, optimal business has also suffered…

A hurtin’ song for Albertans – and a wakeup call to the nation

If the rest of Canada won’t listen to other forms of conversation about the importance of the energy sector, how about a song?

A hurtin’ song for Albertans – and a wakeup call to the nationThings have devolved into such a state of ridiculous zaniness on Canada's energy scape that perhaps it's time to express our travails through that time-proven panacea for all forms of hurt: the country and western song. Such songs can timelessly and eloquently express a range of sentiments and emotions. They’re anthems to spirit, grittiness and…

The compelling arguments against electoral reform in B.C.

Former NDP Premiers Glen Clark and Ujjal Dosanjh may be against electoral reform, but retired lawyer Ian MacLeod expresses his opposition best

The compelling arguments against electoral reform in B.C.We’re in the midst of a mail-in referendum in British Columbia that could dramatically change – and not for the better – how democracy does or doesn’t work in the province. We should really suspect that something is wrong with the proposed changes when people from both major political parties are opposed to the initiative,…

There’s nothing ‘affordable’ about B.C. tax increases

Higher carbon, personal income, payroll, business and residential property taxes will hit B.C. families and make the province less attractive for business

There’s nothing ‘affordable’ about B.C. tax increasesBy Niels Veldhuis and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute “Making your life more affordable” has been a dominant rhetorical theme of British Columbia’s government – so much so that its 2018 budget uses the word “affordable” 76 times. Finance Minister Carole James mentioned “affordable” 26 times in her latest budget speech. While making life more affordable…

B.C. falling short of its considerable mining potential

B.C. miners face more onerous permitting process compared to other provinces. Adding another layer will only make it worse

B.C. falling short of its considerable mining potentialBy Ashley Stedman and Elmira Aliakbari The Fraser Institute To encourage natural resource development and the prosperity that comes with it, mining investors need more certainty about exploration activities – not less. It's an issue that deserves immediate attention in B.C. According to a recent Fraser Institute survey of senior mining executives, British Columbia’s regulatory…

B.C. moves to embrace the essence of good government

As our country has evolved, dialogue is encouraged in education and the media, but is stymied in our highest law-making institutions

B.C. moves to embrace the essence of good government“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” Though the origin of this statement is debated, its essence beautifully summarizes the ideals of our democracy and the importance of freedom of speech. While I have my opinions on certain issues, I thoroughly enjoy and appreciate…

B.C. must rein in public sector wages and benefits

Bringing government employee wages and benefits in line with private-sector norms is key to balancing B.C.’s budget

B.C. must rein in public sector wages and benefitsBy Charles Lammam, Hugh MacIntyre and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute During last year’s election campaign and in his first full budget as premier, John Horgan promised to balance British Columbia’s operating budget. If his NDP government remains committed to this promise, the coming negotiations on compensation with 183 public-sector unions will be critically important. After…

Trans Mountain opponents out of touch with reality

B.C. still exports coal because to do otherwise would be to kill jobs in the province. The contrast with its pipeline stance is startling

Trans Mountain opponents out of touch with realityMany opponents of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion justify their opposition by citing concerns about climate change and carbon emissions, but this raises some important questions. What about coal? Vancouver is North America's largest exporter of coal, one-third of it thermal coal for generating electricity. Vancouver exports U.S. coal because Oregon and Washington have stopped…

No pipeline to energy sector investment

Trudeau government nationalizing Trans Mountain pipeline project is further proof that Canada is closed for business

By Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute In a stunning turn in an already unprecedented saga, Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced last week that the federal government will buy the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion, essentially nationalizing the project. The agreement, which federal Natural Resources Minister Jim…
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