Pepsi tax a sour deal for Newfoundland and Labrador taxpayers

Government maintains its sugar tax is all about keeping you healthy

Pepsi tax a sour deal for Newfoundland and Labrador taxpayersWhat’s all about sweets, sours your wallet and leaves a bitter taste? It’s Premier Andrew Furey’s proposal for a new Pepsi tax. This tax will increase the price of soft drinks by 20 cents a litre. By this time next year, you’ll be paying 15 per cent more for a two-litre bottle of Pepsi at…

Sugar-coating a sugar tax won’t make it any more palatable

If Newfoundland and Labrador pursues a sugar tax, it’s certainly not to get its people to lead healthier lives. It’s about paying bills

Sugar-coating a sugar tax won’t make it any more palatableIn its recent budget, the Newfoundland and Labrador government announced it will introduce a tax of 20 cents per litre on sugary drinks, starting on April 1, 2022. This a first in Canada. So far we know very little about how the tax would work, which products would be affected and how revenues from the…

Policy uncertainty continues to hurt Canada’s mining industry

To attract the investment required to develop resources, mitigating the risks of policy uncertainly needs to be a top priority

Policy uncertainty continues to hurt Canada’s mining industryBy Jairo Yunis and Elmira Aliakbari The Fraser Institute The COVID recession has hurt Canada’s natural resources sector, with supply disruptions, commodity price declines and greater uncertainty regarding future demand. Not surprisingly, capital investment in the Canadian mining industry has dropped to its lowest level since 2009. Of course, business investment should be a key…

COVID crisis opportunity for trade reform in Atlantic Canada

Eliminating trade barriers can help accelerate the economic recovery

COVID crisis opportunity for trade reform in Atlantic CanadaBy Alex Whalen and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute Earlier this summer, the four Atlantic provinces formed the “Atlantic Bubble” as the region works toward freer movement of people amid the COVID crisis. And clearly, the pandemic’s effect on the economy underscores the value of free movement of people and goods, which – on the…

How to save Newfoundlanders from Muskrat Falls disaster

The hydroelectric project mess in Newfoundland and Labrador requires some hard choices. But taxpayers deserve and need some relief

How to save Newfoundlanders from Muskrat Falls disasterThe citizens and taxpayers of Newfoundland and Labrador received important news late in 2018: an autopsy of the horrific financial debacle at Churchill Falls and the beginning of an inquiry into the questionable new Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project. The long legal battle has ended over the Joey Smallwood era’s unprofitable Churchill Falls contract, which the…

Newfoundland needs a legislative budget officer

While no single solution will resolve the province’s fiscal crisis, an LBO would ensure that elected officials are informed in their deliberations

Newfoundland needs a legislative budget officerOur 40 members of the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly are constitutionally required to deliberate and vote on billions of dollars’ worth of spending contained in budgets, supplementary estimates and program proposals annually. And yet outside of those select few MHAs who bear the title of finance minister or premier, our elected representatives lack…

The no-zero policy finally gets a failing grade

But dumping the misguided practice in Newfoundland and Labrador schools is just the beginning – much more reform is needed

The no-zero policy finally gets a failing gradeThe long-standing no-zero policy in Newfoundland and Labrador schools is no more. The chief executive officer of the English School District recently announced that teachers are once again free to deduct marks for late work and assign marks of zero when work doesn’t come in at all. This is a significant step forward, not only…

Gasoline price-fixing harms Atlantic Canada

Controls were intended to ease consumer anger over rare but large price fluctuations. But government isn’t meant to be an anger management therapist

Gasoline price-fixing harms Atlantic CanadaGasoline price controls are a major burden for the minor benefit of having less mercurial cost fluctuations. Government policies are often contradictory. This isn’t directly the result of conspiracy or ill intent. Governments are no different than individuals. We all embrace beliefs that sometimes contradict others we hold. To eliminate these contradictions, Atlantic Canadian governments…

Revenue wells run dry in Newfoundland and Labrador

The latest provincial budget continues a risky strategy: spending far beyond the government's means, as the debt continues to pile up

Revenue wells run dry in Newfoundland and LabradorThe budget strategy laid out by Newfoundland and Labrador in 2016 was simple: the government would hold down program spending, allow for some increases in total spending from higher debt servicing costs, and let rising oil prices and other income balance the books by 2023. Budget 2017 continues that plan. It contains some encouraging measures.…

Creditors will be chief audience for Newfoundland budget

The financial problem facing the government is so large that it will need to borrow enormous amounts over the next five years, no matter what

Creditors will be chief audience for Newfoundland budgetNewfoundland and Labrador's 2017 budget needs to correct a public finance crisis, which has been ushered in by years of high spending and big drops in oil-based revenues. It's a critical time for the province, so the must government make wise decisions in the next few months. During this process, there are three factors that…