Patient care is too important to suffer under central planning

Canada rations care with wait times, limited investment in technology, and by using family doctors as “gatekeepers” to service

Patient care is too important to suffer under central planningDoctors frustrate governments. They think too little about how much health care costs and too much about their patients who need help. The government of Ontario and the Ontario Medical Association arrived at a mediated Proposed Physicians Services Agreement (PPSA) this month. Doctors started to vote on it yesterday, with voting ending on March 27.…

Responding to the pandemic doesn’t have to mean a mountain of debt

The contrast between how New Brunswick and Ontario handled the pandemic is stark

Responding to the pandemic doesn’t have to mean a mountain of debtAs Ontario Premier Doug Ford continues to drive the province speeding toward the edge of a gigantic debt cliff, New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is showing taxpayers that governments can tap the brakes on spending while still dealing with a pandemic. The contrast between the two premiers is stark. As Ford adds tens of billions…

Another year of chaos at Ontario’s universities and colleges

Forcing students to get a booster without evidence of its efficacy just adds insult to injury

Another year of chaos at Ontario’s universities and collegesThe Canadian Academics for Covid Ethics (CA4CE) is a group of researchers and scholars from fields spanning the natural and social sciences and humanities. It is concerned with the mismanagement of the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic response in Canada and around the world.  The following commentary was written by Drs. Kevin Cheung, Claus Rinner, Laurent Leduc,…

Ontario’s insane three-day COVID-19 roller-coaster ride

Political messages that flip-flopped. Controversial policies announced, modified and removed at a mere snap of the fingers

Ontario’s insane three-day COVID-19 roller-coaster rideSeventy-two hours – 4,320 minutes – three days. Doesn’t sound like an enormous stretch of time. In most cases, it’s not. Yet what Ontario experienced from Friday, April 16, to Sunday, April 18, could easily be described as an insane roller-coaster ride for the ages. Wild highs and lows. Political messages that flip-flopped and flop-flipped. Controversial…

Lockdown hysteria defies COVID-19 reality

Given that infections don’t by a long shot equal hospitalizations, civil libertarians are rightly sounding warning bells

Lockdown hysteria defies COVID-19 realityOn Sept. 18, Israel became the first developed country to launch a second COVID-19 lockdown. It came four months after the first lockdown – instituted in March – ended. How Israeli citizens have reacted to the unsustainable nature of renewed lockdowns is instructive for the Canadian jurisdictions that have increased a rhetoric of fear about…

Putting patients first can save Canada’s health system

Patients First could be an incredible moment for health sector leaders to dramatically reshape how health care is delivered

Putting patients first can save Canada’s health systemOntario is getting older. The number of seniors has been steadily increasing and, over the next 20 years, will double. Including factors like increased use of health services and evolving technology, this will result in a substantial increase in demand across the health system. Those services will cost money. In just the continuing care sector…

Mapping the route to more effective health care

To improve value and spur innovation, we need to change the way we pay for health care by encouraging those providers who experiment and innovate

Mapping the route to more effective health careHealth care costs the public sector about $160 billion a year in Canada, a higher per-capita cost than most industrialized nations. Yet Canadians are not markedly healthier, nor do we receive better care. The Commonwealth Fund has ranked Canada 10th out of 11 developed nations for the efficiency of our health-care system (only the United States…

Starting with kids defensible step toward universal pharmacare

But Ontario budget commitment won’t solve all the problems of drug access in Canada, not even in Ontario

Starting with kids defensible step toward universal pharmacareBy Avram Denburg and Wendy Ungar Hospital for Sick Children The Ontario government’s decision to invest in universal drug coverage for those under 25 is a long-needed policy commitment that will help ensure the health of our next generation. As a pediatric oncologist, Dr. Denburg sees children every day who struggle to gain access to the medicines they…

Sustainable pharmacare requires a business-like approach

Out of control spending on Ontario's drug plan could undermine efforts to provide coverage across Canada

Sustainable pharmacare requires a business-like approachOntario’s proposed pharmacare plan for those aged 25 and under is a welcome start that hopefully leads to universal drug coverage for all Ontarians. The case for universal coverage is overwhelming. It’s scandalous that in 2017, many Canadians die for lack of affordable access to basic drugs like insulin.  Increasingly, even those of us with private health insurance coverage face…

Ontario traps those with disabilities in lives of poverty

Restrictions on assets and gifts keep many in a state of deep and profound uncertainty and crisis, but other provinces have found a way out

Ontario traps those with disabilities in lives of povertyBy Helen Ries with Jihan Abbas Contributors In August 2016, Ontario's ombudsman released Nowhere to Turn, which outlined multiple systemic failures in provincial supports and services that lead to crisis for many adults with developmental disabilities. The stories illustrated in the report are often heart-breaking and speak to the many ways that the system leaves people with disabilities vulnerable and trapped…