Stephen Harper returns, and he has plenty to say

The former Conservative prime minister has advice for us on Trump, economics, immigration and more

Stephen Harper is back. After flying under the radar for the last three years, Canada’s former prime minister has returned to the arena, albeit not as an active politician. Instead, he’s a commentator with several messages to impart, all of which are packaged in his new book Right Here Right Now. Not everyone is impressed.…

Data breach tsunami sweeps toward Liberals

In the wake of Christopher Wylie's revelations of personal information mined for political purposes, there will be damage enough for everyone

Data breach tsunami sweeps toward LiberalsIt almost seems kind of quaint. Back when the Conservative Party of Canada was running things, the commentariat were apoplectic about something called CIMS: the Constituent Information Management System. “Tory database draws ire of privacy experts,” went one CTV News headline. An “unethical invasion of Canadians' privacy,” thundered Conservative-turned-Liberal MP Garth Turner. It was “chilling,”…

The black hole of increased funding for scientific research

Increasing investment in science is fine, but rarely does the investment seem to lead to an improvement in the lives of Canadians

The black hole of increased funding for scientific researchIn the recently released 2018 budget, I was pleased to see that the Liberal government has chosen to invest heavily in discovery-based research. According to Finance Minister Bill Morneau, this is the single largest investment in investigator-led fundamental research in Canadian history. This move is welcomed by universities because science was starved by the previous…

Stephen Harper in the rearview mirror

Calling the Harper years a particularly dark time for Canada is partisan fiction, not reality

Stephen Harper in the rearview mirrorWilliam Watson’s Financial Post columns are invariably worth reading. As centre-right economists go, his general perspective isn’t unusual, but his penchant for digging into data can be illuminating. One of the things that a dispassionate person might take away from Watson is a more nuanced view of former Canadian Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper. Harper,…

Trudeau putting Canada’s economic interests at risk

While Asian nations are interested in our goods and services, not one of them is interested in buying the values that Trudeau keeps proselytizing

Trudeau putting Canada’s economic interests at riskEngaging in international trade is perhaps the greatest of Canadian economic traits. We’ve been traders since the first Europeans arrived. The accounts of the competition between les voyageurs and les coureurs du bois, and between the Hudson Bay Co. and the North West Co., are part of national folklore. Canada has always been a nation of…

Seeing red about Canada’s inadequate AIDS policy

We need more courageous policy action at all levels of government to address the structural drivers of HIV/AIDS

Seeing red about Canada’s inadequate AIDS policyBy Suzanne Hindmarch and Michael Orsini EvidenceNetwork.ca We’re seeing red. This month, as World AIDS Day came around, we found ourselves getting angry. The red ribbon has long been a potent symbol of HIV/AIDS activism, signifying anger at the bureaucratic red tape that, in the 1980s, delayed release of life-saving treatments to people living with…

Future Tory leader must look to the past for role models

If the next Conservative Party of Canada leader doesn't maintain and build on the Mulroney-Harper legacy, he or she is doomed to failure

Future Tory leader must look to the past for role modelsTORONTO, Ont., May 2, 2017 /Troy Media/ – The Conservative leadership race was thrown for a loop last week. Businessman and media gadfly Kevin O’Leary unexpectedly dropped out and endorsed former cabinet minister Maxime Bernier. Truth be told, he abandoned his campaign for an odd reason: a lack of support in Quebec. The next federal election is…

Canada’s Conservative party of the present – and the future

The free-for-all to choose the next Tory leader is a competition of political visions and brands – and mediocrity won’t be tolerated

Canada’s Conservative party of the present – and the futureTORONTO, Ont. Dec. 13, 2016/ Troy Media/ – When former prime minister Stephen Harper lost the 2015 federal election, and then stepped down as party leader, most political commentators expected a lively leadership race to choose his successor. They didn’t expect a packed house with little to no breathing room. Without searching the Internet or asking anyone,…

For Canada, ratifying CETA was the easy part

The influx of quality, affordable dairy products will force Canada’s dairy industry to redefine itself within a more competitive landscape

For Canada, ratifying CETA was the easy partHALIFAX, N.S. Oct. 28, 2016/ Troy Media/ – After meltdowns and temper tantrums, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) may finally be ratified. It's nothing short of a miracle and will bring about dramatic change in Canada. The path to a Canada-European Union trade deal has faced several roadblocks in recent months. CETA was initially about growth…

Canada really is back – to mediocrity

Canada, which never looked stronger than under the Harper Tories, looks much weaker under the Trudeau Liberals

Canada really is back – to mediocrityTORONTO, Ont. Sept. 6, 2016/ Troy Media/ - Dear Justin, Hope that you’re having a nice summer with Sophie and the kids. I’m sure that heeding the advice of a longtime conservative columnist, political pundit and speechwriter to former Prime Minister Stephen Harper isn’t at the top of your list. Even so, I hope you’ll…
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