We need to manage the Uber revolution more carefully

The opportunity to augment your income is appealing in an economy that has left so many people far behind

We need to manage the Uber revolution more carefullyTaxis have been commonplace in our cities for decades and – in some cases – centuries. We need to apply the lessons we’ve learned to the ride-sharing revolution. The first documented coach for hire was in 1621, in London, England. It only took 33 years for there to be enough issues that parliament passed a…

How to spark innovation and growth in Canada’s agri-food sector

Unless you intend to grow cannabis in a greenhouse, it’s close to impossible to get capital from investors. It’s time Canadian investors showed some patience

How to spark innovation and growth in Canada’s agri-food sectorAgri-food is seen by many investors as a good space to park their money for the first time in a very long while, at least in the United States. Now we need to find a way to spark the same interest in Canada. Uber, once hailed as the largest initial public offering (IPO) of the…

Classifying Uber drivers as employees stalls innovation

Uber emerged precisely to tackle transportation monopolies in need of disruption. The courts need to get on board

Classifying Uber drivers as employees stalls innovationUber has brought accessible income and affordable transport to tens of millions worldwide. Its disruptive presence, however, has ruffled Luddites and the self-entitled who prefer antiquated supervision to innovative enterprise. This standoff is playing out in Canada's legal system and has grave implications for the entire gig economy. Ontario's top court recently deemed invalid a clause…

B.C.’s ride-sharing red tape hurts consumers

The government is trampling on the rights of ride-sharing businesses and their potential customers

B.C.’s ride-sharing red tape hurts consumersMany British Columbians want rides from Point A to Point B and will pay somebody to drive them. Others have access to cars and want to earn money giving people rides. But the provincial government is preventing these mutually beneficial exchanges. The governing New Democrats promised during the 2017 election campaign that British Columbians would…

Uber’s utter disrespect for social and business norms

The economic benefits of demolishing a monopoly business practice aren’t worth the environmental and human costs

Uber’s utter disrespect for social and business normsUber is embroiled in public controversy yet again with its Twitter release of an embarrassing dash-cam video of Ottawa Senators players mocking a coach while using the ride-sharing service. The tweet of the private conversation, captured on Oct. 29 when the National Hockey League team was between games in Las Vegas and Arizona, has reportedly…

Meal kits set the table for a new food retailing boom

Instead of takeout, consumers can choose a meal kit that allows them to whip up an appealing dish in minutes

Meal kits set the table for a new food retailing boomMeal kits are sweeping across North America. It’s the perfect trend for consumers who want to be empowered by cooking but still need convenience. For example, Walmart has just partnered with Gobble to deliver meal kits. In the battle over the future of food consumption in the U.S., Walmart wants a fighting chance against the industry’s…

Learning to adapt to the growing gig economy

The labour market is changing. creating opportunity and putting pressure on business and government to adapt

Learning to adapt to the growing gig economyThe rise of the gig or sharing economy is one of the most visible trends shaping the contemporary labour market. Most gig jobs fall into the category of contingent work. Such work can be contrasted with a traditional job, in which a person has a durable and structured employment relationship with a specific employer. Today,…

Catching a ride on the ‘creative destructive’ economy

As the taxi industry faces off with Uber, governments should let the marketplace sort out the winners and losers

Catching a ride on the ‘creative destructive’ economyWhat do creation, destruction, sharing and profit have in common? When it comes to the sharing economy, the answer is everything. In slightly over a decade, Uber and Lyft have gone from San Francisco startups to worldwide juggernauts. Their march to becoming international multibillion-dollar companies has sometimes met fierce resistance from taxi companies and community…

Lack of ride-sharing legislation stalls an innovative industry

The ride-sharing industry must operate within a competitive environment rather than be regulated beyond the public’s choice

Lack of ride-sharing legislation stalls an innovative industryThe ride-sharing industry faces regulatory roadblocks as it tries to gain traction across the country. Led by Uber, the industry is disrupting traditional transportation by providing people with alternatives to taxis and buses. The competing choices now include one’s own vehicle, public transit, taxi or Uber (or a similar service). As the ride-sharing industry spreads…

Finally, a ticket to ride: Uber making inroads in Canada

Taxis and ride-sharing services can happily co-exist. Even cabbies are starting to get that

Finally, a ticket to ride: Uber making inroads in Canada“She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care,” goes the old Beatles song. When it comes to Uber, most riders would sing along. If consumer demand was the only issue, the ride-sharing service would probably be operating across Canada by now, just like it does in over 600 cities around the world. Unfortunately,…