USMCA will stunt potentially lifesaving innovation

The new trade agreement represents progress for international trade, but crucially, it weakens protections for the biopharma industry

USMCA will stunt potentially lifesaving innovationIn December, the United States, Mexico and Canada signed a new trade agreement (USMCA) in Mexico City. The agreement represents progress for international trade, but crucially, it weakens protections for the biopharma industry, as the final version of the deal removed provisions that would have extended the exclusivity (essentially, the period of time when brand-name…

Federal government tax cuts miss the mark

We need smart tax cuts that improve incentives for workers, entrepreneurs and investors, along with a balanced budget

Federal government tax cuts miss the markBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Bill Morneau recently confirmed the federal government’s intention to reduce personal income taxes for everyone except “higher-income earners.” With total taxes (federal, provincial and local) consuming 44.7 per cent of the average family’s income in 2019, it’s easy to see why Canadians…

Growing debt a clear and present danger to Canadian economy

Canada’s debt has grown faster than the economy. That dangerous pattern casts a shadow over the nation’s long-term financial health

Growing debt a clear and present danger to Canadian economyBy Alex Whalen and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Just before the holidays, the federal government released its fall economic update. It revealed that Canada’s federal debt-to-gross-domestic-product ratio increased in 2019, meaning Canada’s debt has grown faster than the economy. This is particularly important because the government chose the debt-to-GDP ratio to guide federal fiscal…

Keep federal government from messing with education

Canada's kindergarten-to-Grade 12 system flourishes because it's controlled by the provinces, which often show great innovation and creativity

Keep federal government from messing with educationBy Jason Clemens and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute One of Canada’s great political strengths is that we’re a federalist country, meaning we have constituent provinces with significant powers that are distinguishable from the national government. This separation of powers, at least theoretically, allows the country to split the responsibility for different programs between the…

Many Canadians pay a great deal for ‘free’ health care

The amount we pay for health care through the tax system depends on family income and size

Many Canadians pay a great deal for ‘free’ health careBy Milagros Palacios and Bacchus Barua The Fraser Institute The fall federal election showed that politicians across the spectrum are happy to promise to spend more on our government-run health-care system. Whether the spending is for long-term care or pharmacare, the political solution to any health-care problem seems to be to pump more money into…

More money won’t necessarily solve health care problems

Instead of asking for more money and all the strings that come attached, the provinces should ask for more freedom to try new delivery models

More money won’t necessarily solve health care problemsBy Bacchus Barua and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute Despite their differences, it seems Canada’s premiers are united in one thing: demanding more federal health-care dollars. But nobody talked about the price the premiers must pay for the money from Ottawa: the freedom to design and implement policies that could actually improve care. At the…

Good news for Canadian education – and cause for concern

Despite excellent recent PISA results, Canadians shouldn’t be complacent. From 2015 to 2018, scores fell in all three subjects

Good news for Canadian education – and cause for concernCanada’s 15-year-old students continue to do well on the gold standard of academic testing, but with some concerns. The Programme for International Student Achievement (PISA) has randomly tested students worldwide every three years since 2000. It recently released results from reading, math and science tests completed by some half-a-million students in 79 countries in 2018.…

Activist Liberal government produces red ink and alienation

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is following in the footsteps of his father. That’s leading to fiscal calamity and regional dissent

Activist Liberal government produces red ink and alienationBy Jason Clemens, Milagros Palacios and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute As the dust settles from the federal election – which further exacerbated Western frustration, if not outright separatist sentiments – it’s worth considering the policy ebbs and flows of the Liberal Party under Pierre Trudeau and his son Justin. Therein lies the explanation and…

How to reform Alberta’s energy regulation

Less red tape and shorter decision timelines would improve Alberta’s investment environment and free up AER’s resources

How to reform Alberta’s energy regulationBy Steven Globerman and Jairo Yunis The Fraser Institute In September, Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage announced a formal government review of the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) and replaced the AER’s board of directors with an interim panel. AER’s mandate is governing structure and operational practices in the industry. Since the announcement, several independent investigations…

Municipalities need to rethink tax model

Property tax rates are much higher for businesses than home owners, which can cause serious problems, particularly when the economy falters

Municipalities need to rethink tax modelBy Josef Filipowicz and Steven Globerman The Fraser Institute When homeowners receive their annual property tax bill from city hall, they’re likely unaware that the shop down the street pays a higher property tax rate – probably much higher. For example, according to a new Fraser Institute study, in the Calgary area, the average commercial…