Indigenous communities should tap into the medical tourism market

The James Smith Cree Nation could create what would be Saskatchewan’s first private-pay MRI facility

Indigenous communities should tap into the medical tourism marketA First Nation community about 70 kilometres southeast of Prince Albert, Sask., hopes to generate profit within five years from a private MRI clinic. The James Smith Cree Nation could create what would be the province’s first private-pay MRI facility. This became possible when the Saskatchewan government passed legislation in 2016 allowing for such facilities…

One set of laws for all the only way to end racism in Canada

In his new book There is No Difference, Peter Best details a way to resolve Canada’s legal and social relations with its Indigenous

One set of laws for all the only way to end racism in CanadaIn his new book There Is No Difference, Ontario lawyer Peter Best begins a long-repressed national conversation about Canada’s legal and social relations with its Indigenous people. Best asks: Why can’t Nelson Mandela’s goal and vision of one set of laws for all be the goal in Canada? Why keep and even extend the demonstrably-failing separate…

Backdoor access to encryption threatens the privacy of us all

Will government agencies respect our privacy and work in our best interests? Will access fall into the wrong hands?

Backdoor access to encryption threatens the privacy of us allCanada's spy agencies want access to your encrypted communication – and they have a ploy to get it without going through Parliament. Australia is where the action is taking place, since that country has fewer constitutional protections for privacy. The 2018 Assistance and Access Bill would force tech companies such as Wickr and Telegram to…

As cyber wars erupt, Canada must protect itself

If Canada is serious about standing as a sovereign entity, it would make sense to support our tech companies to ensure our security

As cyber wars erupt, Canada must protect itselfThe United States is pressuring Canada to block telecommunications companies from using equipment provided by Chinese company Huawei when building our 5G cellular network for smartphones. The U.S. logic is along the lines of “We don’t have actual evidence that China is using Huawei’s products to spy on us, but we suspect that they have…

We can’t ignore the roots of some rural crime

Trotting out historical excuses for criminal actions will only leave rural residents to continue to be terrorized by gangsters

We can’t ignore the roots of some rural crimeRural crime near troubled reserves on the Prairies must be acknowledged if there’s any hope of remedying the situation. Doug Cuthand, an Indigenous Saskatchewan columnist, believes the phrase ‘rural crime‘ is code for crimes committed by Indigenous thugs. But in Saskatchewan, for example, an Indigenous man is 33 times as likely to be convicted of…

Does Canadian culture warrant widespread taxpayer support?

Protecting cultural industries from competition and propping them up with public money is just wasteful

Does Canadian culture warrant widespread taxpayer support?Many advocates for cultural diversity have a sudden change of heart when the topic turns to Canada's ‘cultural industries.’ As they say in Argentina, for money, the monkey will dance. What constitutes Canadian heritage, given its complex milieu, tends to be in the eye of the beholder. However, the heritage is so weak that, supposedly,…

The strangling nature of Canada’s ‘duty to consult’ the Indigenous

A recent Supreme Court decision seems to have loosened the constraints, but will new legislation push such matters to the UN?

The strangling nature of Canada’s ‘duty to consult’ the IndigenousThe Supreme Court of Canada’s Mikisew decision, delivered on Oct. 11, 2018, marks what could be a very significant development in Canadian law – possibly ushering in a more reasonable era, where courts intervene less in matters that properly belong to the people’s elected representatives. Let me explain: Section 35 was written into Canada’s brand…

What’s next for climate and energy policy?

The mid-term U.S. elections bring mixed messages that require climate change and renewable energy reality checks

What’s next for climate and energy policy?The “Blue Wave” never really reached shore, the U.S. Senate is still in Republican hands after the mid-term elections, the House of Representatives flipped to Democratic control, Trump-era deregulation and fossil fuel production efforts continue, several governorships and state houses went from red to blue – and almost all state renewable energy and carbon tax…

Economic growth and innovation crucial to fighting poverty

Raising taxes to fund spending on the poor discourages wealth creation and productive work effort, shrinking the economic pie

Economic growth and innovation crucial to fighting povertyInstead of having government take more from the rich in hopes that it will go to the poor, a far better poverty reduction strategy is to encourage economic growth and innovation. Yale University economist William Nordhaus was one of the winners of the Nobel Prize in economics this year for his work on analyzing the…

Carbon taxes defy science, cripple economies

Fossil fuels are what made our health and economic progress over the past 150 years possible – and continue to do so

Carbon taxes defy science, cripple economiesThe U.S. House of Representatives recently passed a non-binding resolution that a carbon tax would kill jobs, damage the revitalized American economy, and disproportionately impact poor, minority and working class families. The vote also reflects the fact that America is still over 80 per cent dependent on fossil fuels – and helps explain why a…
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