National Day of Truth and Reconciliation well-intentioned but hollow

The transition from symbolism to action will be more difficult than Canadians imagine

National Day of Truth and Reconciliation well-intentioned but hollowCanada’s first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation fell far short of expectations. The continuing pandemic did not help, nor did the unevenness of the holiday/commemoration across the country. As expected, most Canadians who had a day off used it as personal time. Only a small number took the opportunity to engage with Indigenous peoples…

The cities are taking over Canadian politics

Recognizing the political power of Canadian cities has become a core element of national politics

The cities are taking over Canadian politicsThe parsing of the federal election results is underway, as Canadians seek insights into leadership, party fortunes, regional concerns, and the priorities of special interest groups. This process often exposes major currents in Canada’s political culture and provides the country with a glimpse into what lies ahead. In my view, a major focus should be…

Rebuilding democratic ideals after the surrender of Afghanistan

Multilateral bodies have an important role to play in spreading democracy

Rebuilding democratic ideals after the surrender of AfghanistanWith democrats everywhere grieving over recent events in Afghanistan and the 20th anniversary of 9/11, it is worth recalling that as the first plane struck the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2001, all 35 Organization of American States (OAS) member governments were in Peru signing a democratic charter that denied OAS membership to…

How did we make reconciliation about white folks?

Many of the educational efforts associated with reconciliation are targeted at non-Indigenous peoples

How did we make reconciliation about white folks?Something strange has been happening on the road to true reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission produced clear recommendations on how the country could shed the bitter legacy of Indigenous residential schools. Yet, following revelations about gravesites near formal residential schools, the process seems to have morphed into measures designed to serve…

Canada is obligated to help the people of Afghanistan

To do anything less would be to our eternal shame

Canada is obligated to help the people of AfghanistanIn traditional Afghan tribal culture, there is a concept called Nanawatai that roughly translates to sanctuary or asylum. Under that concept, if a person in need invokes Nanawatai, the other party must come to their aid. The western project to recreate Afghanistan as a representative and socially liberal state (at least within the standards of…

What the fall of Hong Kong means for Taiwan, and the world

Beijing has made it easier for the world to understand why Taiwan is adamantly opposed to annexation by its Communist neighbour

What the fall of Hong Kong means for Taiwan, and the worldHong Kong as we knew it – more open, more liberal – is no more. With its demise, the “one country, two systems” formula, under which the former British colony was incorporated into the People’s Republic of China in 1997, has also collapsed. Whatever the foundations of this political construct may have been, there is…

What if money is not the answer for Indigenous communities?

The feds tend to use money as a surrogate to real commitment

What if money is not the answer for Indigenous communities?The government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has made extraordinary financial commitments to Indigenous peoples in Canada. The number and scale of the allocations over the past few years have been staggering, both in comparative and absolute terms. Last week, the federal government and First Nations reached an agreement on water supplies on reserves, estimated…

C-135 provides a new approach to Canada’s policy toward Taiwan

Represents a significant opportunity for decision-makers to advance a relationship that has tremendous potential for Canada

C-135 provides a new approach to Canada’s policy toward TaiwanBy Shuvaloy Majumdar and J. Michael Cole Macdonald-Laurier Institute In 2021, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) turned 100, and for more than 50 years, Canada has recognized the legitimacy of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) run by the CCP. The hope that began in the 1970s (and has persisted with limited evidence of success…

Canada needs to respond to the use of child soldiers in Ethiopia

Contrary to what the New York Times and AP claim, these children are not “highly motivated young recruits"

Canada needs to respond to the use of child soldiers in EthiopiaBy Ann Fitz-Gerald and Hugh Segal Macdonald-Laurier Institute When the recent conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region first flared in November 2020, with an unprovoked violent attack by the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) on federal forces, the Western media and many aid donors chose their side early on – and it was not Prime Minister…

Taiwan deserves a clear-eyed assessment of the potential for war

The U.S. and its allies should signal in no uncertain terms that dragging the world into war over Taiwan would impose severe costs on China

Taiwan deserves a clear-eyed assessment of the potential for warThe increase in Chinese military activity near Taiwan over the past year has engendered a tremendous amount of commentary and analysis from various circles, professional and not. With People’s Liberation Army (PLA) aircraft intruding into Taiwan’s southern Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) occurring on a near-daily basis, and with record-breaking numbers in some instances, the…
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