Why you still subsidize some channels when you pay your cable bill

Little wonder that the CRTC has been the focus of so much public contempt

Why you still subsidize some channels when you pay your cable billForget for a moment that roughly five per cent of your cable bill goes to subsidize films and shows that not enough people watch: the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission is about to dip back into the 20th century and tell you what to watch and make you pay for it. The federal regulator announced last month…

A more open CRTC is a great leap forward

The names of Commissioners appointed to public panels will now be made public two weeks prior to the commencement of the hearing

A more open CRTC is a great leap forwardTransparency is among the most controversial topics in the public policy arena. So it’s surprising that few if any pundits latched onto the significance of a recent tweak by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) regarding how it runs its hearings. Going forward, tweeted @CRTCeng, the names of Commissioners (the people exercising oversight impacting…

Tuning in to a new Canadian television reality, thanks to Netflix

As the streaming service pours millions into Canadian productions, the CRTC's hands-off decision looks inspired

Tuning in to a new Canadian television reality, thanks to NetflixThe best thing the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) ever did about Netflix was never doing anything about Netflix. It wasn’t easy. Getting a regulator to resist regulating is like trying to keep a retrieving dog from chasing sticks in ponds. Plus, many within Canada’s codependent film and programming industries were, from the moment…

Your bills will go up – but don’t assume an insidious CRTC plot

The debate over internet, cable and mobile rates is far more complex than the Twitter universe reflects

Your bills will go up – but don’t assume an insidious CRTC plotAll the average citizen knows about their cable, mobile and Internet bills is that – like taxes – they always  go up. For those who care why this happens, a brief Twitter tour of #crtc will introduce you to the debates surrounding the inexhaustible and often catty haggling over how your cable, cellphone and Internet…

Ringing the Bell on American ads during Super Bowl broadcasts

The CRTC, led by its new chairman, is expected to reverse the controversial decision related to simultaneous ad substitution

Ringing the Bell on American ads during Super Bowl broadcastsIt being the time of year to make football predictions, here’s one: there won’t be any U.S. Super Bowl ads on cable broadcasts of the big game when it comes around again early next year. Ian Scott, incoming chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), will have the unpopular task of reversing the…

Finding salvation in the ashes of the daily newspaper business

The CBC can be the link to broader success, if it goes ad-free and makes its news content freely available to other news platforms

Finding salvation in the ashes of the daily newspaper businessSometime in the not-too-distant future, the nation’s largest media chain is expected to fail, taking many of the nation’s once proud but now emaciated major daily newspapers to the grave with it. Postmedia and others have already issued appeals to the federal government, just as television broadcasters have, with more success, lobbied the Canadian Radio-television…