Vancouver can’t have both low-density and affordable housing

To take pressure off the cost of living in Vancouver, the city should build more housing units on its limited geographic footprint

Vancouver can’t have both low-density and affordable housingBy Steve Lafleur and Josef Filipowicz The Fraser Institute Housing prices in Vancouver have caused a frenzy, as analysts, pundits and activists wrestle with how to improve affordability. The discussion has fixated on foreign buyers, speculators and empty houses. Regardless of the policies implemented to address these factors, trying to increase affordability by sniffing out…

Alberta NDP rejects prosperous polices of the Chretien era

Approach reminiscent of the failed deficit-reduction strategies of Alberta governments throughout the 1970s and 1980s

Alberta NDP rejects prosperous polices of the Chretien eraBy Ben Eisen Steve Lafleur and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute The Alberta government will run another budget deficit this year – the ninth deficit in 10 years – and it’s important to recognize that the province has been here before. After running steep deficits for much of the mid-1980s to the early 1990s, the…

Taxing foreigners no answer to Toronto’s housing woes

The idea might have some intuitive appeal but misses the bigger point – Toronto needs more housing

Taxing foreigners no answer to Toronto’s housing woesBy Steve Lafleur and Josef Filipowicz The Fraser Institute The idea of a tax on foreign homebuyers has reared its head in Ontario once again. After British Columbia last year announced it would tax foreign buyers an extra 15 per cent on residential real estate in Metro Vancouver, Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa said he…

Did the Alberta government really slow down spending growth?

The recently released fiscal update shows program spending up nearly 10 per cent from last year’s level

Did the Alberta government really slow down spending growth?By Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute Alberta’s recent speech from the throne laid out the Notley government’s vision for the upcoming legislative session. In doing so, the government rightly noted that Alberta’s big deficits are partly the result of spending increases by successive governments over the past 15 years. The government’s acceptance…

Ontario government’s plan: let Toronto traffic get worse

By burying the latest modest road-pricing scheme, Queen’s Park virtually guarantees worsening traffic congestion in the GTA for the foreseeable future

Ontario government’s plan: let Toronto traffic get worseBy Steve Lafleur and Kenneth Green The Fraser Institute Much of the conversation about the Wynne government’s decision to block Toronto City Council’s plan to toll the Don Valley Parking Lot – sorry, Parkway – and the Gardiner Expressway, has focused on the lost revenue for city hall. But a far more important point is…

Government’s spendthrift ways are burying Albertans in debt

The government’s claim that Alberta’s deficit is as big as it is because of forces outside of the province’s control is untrue

Government’s spendthrift ways are burying Albertans in debtBy Steve Lafleur and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci recently unveiled Alberta’s Third Quarter Fiscal and Economic Update. Many observers expected the deficit to be reduced somewhat due to increased oil prices since the last update. And, thanks to the uptick in oil prices, the province has collected significantly more…

Let’s make room for skilled workers in Metro Vancouver

If housing costs remain high, and rental vacancy rates stay razor-thin, the region may soon be out of reach to locals and newcomers alike

Let’s make room for skilled workers in Metro VancouverBy Steve Lafleur and Josef Filipowicz The Fraser Institute Many tech companies and employees are scrambling to adjust to the recent executive order issued by U.S. President Donald Trump restricting entry from seven countries, and rumours of an impending crackdown on visas for foreign workers. Giants like Google, Facebook and Apple have denounced the move,…

Canada needs a strong Alberta economy

The recent census gives Canadians a sense of the outsized role Alberta has played in powering Canada's economy

Canada needs a strong Alberta economyBy Steve Lafleur and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute The first batch of census data was released recently, giving Canadians a peek at how the country evolved between 2011 and 2016. One of the biggest stories is the substantial growth of Alberta. The province's rapid population boom until 2015 helped re-shape the country as Alberta…

Despite big deficit, Alberta leads the country in spending growth

The provincial government has made no meaningful efforts to slow the rate of spending growth to stem the flood of red ink

Despite big deficit, Alberta leads the country in spending growthBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute Rapid spending growth by successive Alberta governments – and not depressed commodity prices – are primarily responsible for the province's big deficit, according to a Fraser Institute study. But Finance Minister Joe Ceci describes the New Democratic government’s approach to fiscal management and spending growth as “prudent” and states that “severe cuts” would…

Why Alberta can’t get a handle on its chronic deficits

The fundamental problem in Alberta is that spending growth over several years exceeds revenue growth

Why Alberta can’t get a handle on its chronic deficitsBy Steve Lafleur and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Joe Ceci recently mused that Alberta’s 2016-17 deficit may be lower than the eye-popping $10.8 billion projected in the Second Quarter Fiscal Update, due to higher than expected oil prices. Higher oil prices and a slightly reduced deficit would, of course, be welcome. But…