Indigenous ownership in Canadian oil and gas takes huge step

But Trudeau government's emissions cap threatens future prosperity

Indigenous ownership in Canadian oil and gas takes huge stepA massive milestone has been reached in the growing trend of Indigenous people taking ownership of Canadian oil and gas projects. Twenty-three First Nations and Métis communities in northern Alberta are investing $1.1 billion to become part owners of seven Enbridge oil sands pipelines. It’s described as the largest energy-related Indigenous partnership transaction in North…

Indigenous peoples faced with a choice of development or poverty

The right choice is staring us in the face

Indigenous peoples faced with a choice of development or povertyIf First Nations are to have a chance at seeing real self-determination, equity deals in natural resource development must be part of the conversation. Having ownership of the projects taking place on our land not only gives us own-source revenue but also gives us the ability to have a seat at the table and be…

Proposed emissions cap will hurt Indigenous economies

Tens of billions of dollars in wages, contracts and own source revenues are at risk

Proposed emissions cap will hurt Indigenous economiesOn July 18, the federal government announced a plan to reduce emissions from the oil and gas sector by 42 per cent in just eight years. To meet such targets, this policy would effectively stop all new projects in the oil and gas sector, as well as curtail existing ones. This would dramatically affect global…

Justin Trudeau’s plan for Indigenous communities has failed

Segregation and special rights have always been the problem. Integration has always been the answer

Justin Trudeau’s plan for Indigenous communities has failedThe Sanderson murders are receiving a lot of media attention, as they should. Much has been written about the government policy of pretending that truly dangerous people, like these brothers, are victims, and returning them to Indigenous communities, where they inevitably victimize residents. Claiming this cruel policy – killing with kindness – somehow helps Indigenous…

Killing Trans Mountain project would devastate Indigenous communities

Ottawa must bring in legislation to ensure the project gets built now more than ever

Killing Trans Mountain project would devastate Indigenous communitiesOttawa needs to finally declare through legislation that the Trans Mountain Expansion Project is to the national advantage of Canada. Doing so would prove to the Canadian public and Indigenous communities that the federal government is serious about seeing it completed. Make no mistake, killing the project would be devastating for many Indigenous communities along…

Moving aboriginal services closer to people a good idea

But the temptation to allow old-school First Nation politics into the system must be avoided

Moving aboriginal services closer to people a good ideaManitobans should be cautiously optimistic about a deal that will transfer health care for Indigenous communities in the province to a regional Indigenous authority. If done properly and not politicized, a deal between the federal government, the Manitoba government and First Nations in southern Manitoba could really improve health care for Indigenous communities in the…

Indigenous education can and must be fixed

If the current arrangements continue, the result will be another lost generation or two

Indigenous education can and must be fixedCanadians have talked extensively about Indigenous education, with much of the recent conversation wrapped up in the condemnation of residential schools. But, despite loud and consistent protests by Indigenous leaders and others, the country has done precious little to address antiquated delivery processes, systemic failings and tragically disappointing outcomes. It might seem odd to say…

One Indigenous inquiry after another proves fruitless

All the social and justice indicators show that things have only worsened among Indigenous peoples

One Indigenous inquiry after another proves fruitlessThe March 9, 1988, police shooting of J.J. Harper on the streets of Winnipeg and the much earlier murder of Helen Betty Osborne in The Pas in 1971 led Manitoba Premier Howard Pawley’s government to commission the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry (AJI) on April 13, 1988. This occurred in the middle of the election campaign that…

Lockdowns damage the vulnerable the most

Clearly having a disproportionately negative effect on Indigenous peoples

Lockdowns damage the vulnerable the mostOne clear takeaway from the convoy protest is the realization that pandemic restrictions and mandates are not affecting everyone equally. Liberal MP Joel Lightbound’s clever retort of, “Not everyone can still earn a living using their MacBook while at the cottage,” encapsulated this sentiment almost perfectly. For many working-class and wage economy Canadians, lockdowns and…

Note to Americans: Education is not genocide

The claims of thousands of “missing children” are false

Note to Americans: Education is not genocideThings have taken a strange turn in Canada on the genocide front. Genocide? Canada? Those are words that you would not normally see together. Words like “polite” or “peaceful” might come to mind. But “genocide,” not so much. In fact, the picture of placid Canadians as practitioners of genocide is downright disturbing. But that is…
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