Canadian students need a return to regular classes this fall

Students learn best when they develop strong personal connections with their teachers. We need to stop dwelling on worst-case scenarios

Canadian students need a return to regular classes this fallOne thing we’ve learned this year is that global pandemics have a big impact on teaching and learning. In mid-March, regular kindergarten-to-Grade-12 classes across Canada were suspended and instruction moved online. While schools in some provinces partially reopened in June, this doesn’t mean things are back to normal just yet. Students gained limited access to…

Polytechnic education critical to the front-line workforce

Government needs to be thinking about smart investments to make applied education safe and accessible

Polytechnic education critical to the front-line workforceThe important role of front-line workers has never been more apparent than over the last several weeks. They include nurses and personal support workers, paramedics and other first responders, technology professionals and skilled tradespeople, and those working in advanced manufacturing or supplying us with food. These have been the people with the skills and know-how…

Can parent-teachers adequately educate their children?

Greater accountability in teaching and learning could be a very positive outcome from this enforced homeschooling

Can parent-teachers adequately educate their children?Canadian students have been out of school for more than two months because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and parents are taking on increased responsibilities in homeschooling. In many cases, parents are reluctant teachers, asking themselves if they’re doing an adequate job. There are three questions they probably want answered: Can I do a good job…

Pandemic gives us a chance to re-imagine education

Why do we try to force kids into the same educational mould – especially when we have the technology to do things differently?

Pandemic gives us a chance to re-imagine educationWith school districts in some parts of Canada drafting plans to reopen, it’s time we ask: What have we learned about education from the days our school buildings were closed? We might say we’ve learned during the COVID-19 pandemic that there’s a lot more good out there than we’d have hoped to imagine – a…

Will home education be a post-pandemic policy?

Transportation, infrastructure and maintenance costs will be minimized, as will human resources expenses

Will home education be a post-pandemic policy?Hats off to teachers, support staff and leaders who have quickly led an historic transition from bricks-and-mortar programming to online and home-school learning for Canadian students. Considering the short timeline, adhering to the protocols set forth by political leaders, and the limited teaching resources, the educational community, students and families came together in the most…

Alberta throws a stick of dynamite into education system

Being tested and labelled at an early age can have a devastating effect on a child’s self-esteem and intellectual potential

Alberta throws a stick of dynamite into education systemIf Steve Bannon isn’t on the Alberta government’s payroll, he certainly is its muse. Bannon is the notorious former strategic adviser to U.S. President Donald Trump. His views on the benefits of disruption might well inform Premier Jason Kenney’s government tactics of mass disruption in many sectors. These include the most vital areas of health…

Closed secularism breeds intolerance

Divorcing a spiritual practice from its religious meaning is problematic and a forcible whitewashing of something deeply and fundamentally complex

Closed secularism breeds intoleranceBy David Hunt and Brian Dijkema Cardus Most court decisions are a zero-sum game. One side’s win is the other’s loss. But this was not the result recently at the B.C. Supreme Court in Nanaimo. Both sides, and the public, lost in Servatius versus Alberni School District No. 70. One side wanted smudging ceremonies and…

How to make provincial education spending pay off

Providing greater educational diversity through independent schools helps B.C. and Quebec achieve better student performance – at a lower cost

How to make provincial education spending pay offBy Tegan Hill and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute One of the great advantages of Canada’s federation is that subnational governments can experiment with ways of providing public services and adopt the best system. In the case of public education (a provincial responsibility), the provinces can look to Quebec and British Columbia to learn about…

Keep federal government from messing with education

Canada's kindergarten-to-Grade 12 system flourishes because it's controlled by the provinces, which often show great innovation and creativity

Keep federal government from messing with educationBy Jason Clemens and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute One of Canada’s great political strengths is that we’re a federalist country, meaning we have constituent provinces with significant powers that are distinguishable from the national government. This separation of powers, at least theoretically, allows the country to split the responsibility for different programs between the…
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