The Liberal’s lukewarm shift toward electoral reform

The Trudeau government’s belated commitment to election law revisions is welcome, if far short of earlier promises

The Liberal’s lukewarm shift toward electoral reformThe recent introduction by the federal government of Bill C 76, meant to overhaul Canada’s Election Act, raises the question: Is a belated commitment to improving electoral democracy better than no commitment at all? The answer has to be yes. However, the Liberals have been conspicuously ambivalent and lukewarm on electoral reform during their time…

Leave our electoral system alone

British Columbians are being asked, for the third time, to vote on drastic electoral changes. It would be a mistake

Leave our electoral system aloneAmericans look upon their government to ensure them life, liberty and the chance to pursue happiness. In Canada, peace, order and good government are what we expect from our leaders. For the last 150 years that is what we have received. Canada is one of the best countries in the world to live because we…

A two-step approach to electoral reform

One referendum, with little public education, is not enough. Voters need to have full knowledge of the consequences of their choices

A two-step approach to electoral reformIn its haste to change the way we vote, British Columbia’s new government has created an unnecessarily short timeline. While advocates for reform think the speedy process will help their cause, it’s more likely to result in another failed attempt at changing the way representatives are selected. The government’s public consultation campaign on the referendum…

‘None of the above’ should be a valid ballot choice

Voters should be given the opportunity to say none of the options are acceptable. It could lay the foundation for a stronger democracy

‘None of the above’ should be a valid ballot choiceImagine holding an election in which no one wins. When none of the candidates meet our expectations, it’s an appealing idea. How often have each of us looked at the choices on the ballot, sighed and asked ourselves, “Is this the best we can do?” Having nothing but poor choices can lead to a sense…

Shining a light on the dark side of municipal campaign financing

By informing the public about who provided campaign support before the election, the public can watch for any favoritism after

Shining a light on the dark side of municipal campaign financingAnyone who has been involved in municipal politics – at least over the past couple of decades – has heard virtually every candidate say they support increased transparency. Why do they say this and then not follow through? Transparency makes the democratic process work better because the public can understand, and then react to the…

Time to question foreign influence on Canada’s oil debate

The Dogwood Initiative, Leadnow, and Greenpeace receive substantial funding from a U.S. advocacy group called Tides

Time to question foreign influence on Canada’s oil debateWith the kids back to school and Thanksgiving now behind us, for Canadian households the fall season brings a few things back into sharp focus. We all have bills to pay, careers to foster, aging parents and extended family (sometimes on the other side of the world) to support. And now there’s one more thing…

Small Green Party may wield big power in B.C

Voters of smaller parties are empowered disproportionately in minority governments, at the expense of the majority of voters, who tend to vote for a main party

Small Green Party may wield big power in B.CBy Lydia Miljan and Taylor Jackson The Fraser Institute The alliance between Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver and John Horgan, premier-designate and NDP leader, will be central to the new government in British Columbia. Political alliances, however, are not formed on good graces. Weaver has some well-publicized demands, which reportedly include official party status for the Greens…

Changing B.C.’s electoral system requires a referendum

Because electoral reform was not a major issue in the recent election campaign, the Green Party can't claim a legitimate mandate for change without public input

By Lydia Miljan and Taylor Jackson The Fraser Institute British Columbia’s recent election may be the last under a first-past-the-post (FPTP) voting system. Why? Because the New Democrats needed the support of the Green Party to form a majority coalition, and as a condition of their support, the Greens demanded that the province’s electoral system…

Electoral reform by any other name is still progress

Relax party discipline to dent the iron control of a majority government, forcing it to make compromises and behave less like a dictatorship

Electoral reform by any other name is still progressCALGARY, Alta., April 23, 2017 /Troy Media/ – Start talking about parliamentary reform at a cocktail party and watch everyone melt away. But despite being an eye-glazing topic, there are good reasons why Canadians should take interest. The Liberal government proposes changes to House of Commons procedures to create “greater accountability” and to “empower members to more fully…

N.B. on its way to building a more inclusive democracy

Electoral reform recommendations seek to build a bigger democratic tent and populate it with under-represented New Brunswickers

N.B. on its way to building a more inclusive democracyFREDERICTON, N.B. Mar. 14, 2017 /Troy Media/ – Democracy only works if all citizens have an equal role in the process. New Brunswick is working diligently to ensure that equality remains entrenched. The province has completed the first stage of its electoral reform journey. Earlier this month, an independent commission submitted a list of recommendations for reform.…