National pharmacare will be very expensive and likely unnecessary

National pharmacare will be very expensive and likely unnecessaryAccording to reports, the Trudeau government may unveil a national pharmacare program in Wednesday’s throne speech in Ottawa. The program may be based on last year’s Hoskins’ report, which recommended an expensive top-down Medicare-style approach that would artificially set drugs prices, restrict patient choice and limit private alternatives. Not only would such a program drive…

Alberta desperately needs to reduce its labour costs

Alberta desperately needs to reduce its labour costsAt the end of August Finance Minister Travis Toews released his budget update, which was 20 pages doused from top to bottom in red ink. Albertans couldn’t afford our high-cost provincial government before the pandemic. And Toews’ budget update shows we definitely can’t afford our high-cost provincial government now. At $24 billion, this year’s deficit…

Feds should learn from Ontario’s green energy failure

But Ontario’s experience is being ignored and could lead to billions more spent and higher energy costs for Canadians

Feds should learn from Ontario’s green energy failureBy Elmira Aliakbari and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Gerry Butts, former principal secretary to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, is at the heart of a new group, the Task Force for a Resilient Recovery, which recently released a series of recommendations for massive investment in green projects. The recommendations seems to be influencing the prime…

Sooner or later, we will pay for federal spending

Trudeau isn’t saying no new taxes; he’s saying we should continue to spend today and pay for it with taxes tomorrow

Sooner or later, we will pay for federal spendingBy Tegan Hill and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Despite promising significant increases to already historically high spending, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently pledged there will be no new taxes. This rhetoric is simply false. To pay for today’s spending, the Liberal government must either tax today or defer tax increases to the future by…

Trudeau needs to turn off the emergency spending taps

Trudeau needs to turn off the emergency spending tapsAs Canada slowly begins to emerge from a pandemic-induced shutdown, a severe economic hangover persists: a $343 billion deficit as of early July’s fiscal snapshot. In reality, it is certain to be even higher by the time newly-minted Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland gets around to preparing a fiscal update in the fall. With a deficit…

Tough times ahead: what is Trudeau prepared to cut?

The federal government’s single biggest cost centre is the $51 billion it spends on salaries and benefits for its 368,000 employees

Tough times ahead: what is Trudeau prepared to cut?As Preston Manning used to say the last time the federal deficit was so big, when you’re in a hole the first thing to do is stop digging. Very soon now, the Trudeau government needs to put down its very large shovel. Getting Canada’s $343 billion federal deficit under control will be a daunting task.…

Federal finances remain vulnerable to fluctuating interest rates

Federal finances remain vulnerable to fluctuating interest ratesBy Alex Whalen and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute There’s been a lot of movement in Ottawa lately, including Bill Morneau’s resignation as federal Finance minister, with Chrystia Freeland taking his place. Unfortunately, the federal government’s recent fiscal snapshot only added to the uncertainty. Why? Because there’s no plan to restore sustainability in federal finances. This…

We can’t dodge deficits and debt forever

A government deficit is sometimes necessary but we need plans in place to eliminate it and reduce the debt

We can’t dodge deficits and debt foreverDeficits have become emotive hot buttons. A deficit arises when governments spend more than their income, which consists mainly of taxes. If the deficiency is not immediately covered, current deficits turn into long-term government debt. No one seems to be neutral about deficits and the resulting debt. Traditional economists argue against them, saying that spending…

Alberta is right to expand its employee sunshine list

The single biggest day-to-day expense for the Alberta government is labour costs

Alberta is right to expand its employee sunshine listThe single biggest day-to-day expense for the Alberta government is labour costs. And with taxpayers footing the bill, we deserve to know just how much we are paying for all government employees with six-figure salaries. While Alberta’s sunshine list discloses the salaries and benefits of bureaucrats making more than $111,000 per year and employees of…
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