Mental health therapies should be fully funded by medicare

Publicly funding comprehensive treatment for depression is cost-effective

Mental health therapies should be fully funded by medicareHeadlines tell us in detail about the mental health struggles of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain before their deaths by suicide. But what too often goes untold are the stories of thousands of people who die by suicide every year in Canada – our friends, relatives, colleagues and neighbours. What’s also not well documented is…

How to remedy poor health outcomes created by poverty

Social assistance programs in Canada are falling behind. It's time we expanded basic coverage to include drug and dental care

How to remedy poor health outcomes created by povertyBy Arjumand Siddiqi and Odmaa Sod-Erdene EvidenceNetwork.ca Public health researchers have long known that poverty and poor health are linked, but new evidence suggests that social assistance – the government system designed to provide those in poverty with income support – is not succeeding at protecting health.  Using data from national government surveys, we studied the…

The private cost of health-care queues in Canada

Our closed government-heavy system stands in stark contrast to other universal health-care systems that have shorter wait times

The private cost of health-care queues in CanadaIt’s no secret that Canadians face some of the longest health-care wait times in the developed world. According to the Fraser Institute’s annual survey of physicians, at 21.2 weeks from referral to treatment, Canadians waited longer in 2017 than ever before. And for some patients, wait times can have serious consequences. While this may be…

Prevention cuts demand on the health system

Increased spending has entrenched an inefficient system that has inflated the cost of getting the same outcomes. It’s time for change

Prevention cuts demand on the health systemProvincial ministers of health and finance seek to ‘bend the health care cost curve’ but year after year, provincial budgets bend the curve in the wrong direction, adding billions of dollars to provincial health spending. We’ve doubled spending on our medical treatment system in Canada since 2005 – and what did we get? Not improved…

The silent health crisis

Canadians have realized little health benefit from the billions spent on health information systems

The silent health crisisBy David Zitner and Dominic Covvey Atlantic Institute for Market Studies Airplane crashes are big – and bad – news. That helps drive the industry to improve airplanes and instrumentation, pilot training and air traffic control practices. Public awareness, then, provide part of the impetus for change. The debacle over the federal government payroll information…

Seniors migration costs B.C. $7.2 billion in health-care expenses

Migrating seniors are likely to have paid most of their lifetime taxes in one province while consuming most of their health care in another

Seniors migration costs B.C. $7.2 billion in health-care expensesBy Ashley Stedman and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute An imbalance in health-care funding caused by the migration of seniors is penalizing British Columbia’s taxpayers. Canada’s health-care system has lots of problems, including its comparatively high cost, long wait times and middling performance among universal health-care countries. One largely overlooked problem is how Canada’s financing…

What should we pay for in our publicly-funded health system?

If we are going to invest more money, we should place it where we can improve people’s health, recognizing that more service is not always better

As a recent Globe and Mail investigation has noted, some Canadians have had to pay extra for care they thought would be fully covered. The investigation reveals how complex this set of issues can be. Many don’t realize that Canada’s health-care system is not public. Unlike public school teachers, those providing health care are not…

Making sense of health funding dollars and cents

There are provincial winners and losers in the changing world of the Canada Health Transfer and the future could hold even larger discrepancies in funding

Making sense of health funding dollars and centsThe last few years have seen dramatic changes to the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), which in 2017-18 will total $37.150 billion – no small figure. Former prime minister Stephen Harper initiated a full per-capita funding formula without a tax-point equalizing adjustment in 2014-15 – basically a top-down policy change. Harper continued with the six per…