Beyond carding: how police surveillance has dangerously evolved

The end of carding won’t cease the gathering of information. Instead, it will be entered into police data bases without the public’s knowledge

Beyond carding: how police surveillance has dangerously evolvedWe’re in the era of predictive policing, geo-profiling and crime prevention – carding 2.0 – and need to ask the tough questions about what that means. Understanding and safeguarding personal freedom and civil rights is more critical than ever. The pace at which artificial intelligence is being developed and incorporated is far outpacing the regulatory…

We must manage the Internet of things with care

Who will ensure devices have been tested thoroughly and are secure? Who will ensure our privacy is protected?

We must manage the Internet of things with careBack in the early 1990s, I came across a story about a Coke machine that you could query from anywhere on the Internet and it would tell you the temperature of the drinks, the last time it was stocked and how full it was. The machine was in the computer science department of Carnegie Mellon…

Visual intelligence is the next wave of digital security

Visual intelligence allows for face identification, incident recognition, behaviour monitoring, object identification and even face or activity prediction

Visual intelligence is the next wave of digital securityBusiness owners and managers increasingly deal with information overload, including from camera feeds. The cost outlay for a good camera system with extensive storage is dropping daily and new technologies that promise to process all this information continue to emerge. But although it’s valuable information, it’s also exceedingly time consuming to sift through all the…

Towing the party line in the Internet age

It’s worthwhile remembering that before the Internet, instant messaging, social media and meme merchandising, depending on where you lived, almost nothing was private

Towing the party line in the Internet ageOne morning in the late 1980s in the middle of Nowheresville, a young woman, prompted by a profound sense of neighbourliness, impressed a couple of city girls by introducing them to her new pony, all of 12 hands tall. At the sight of the hoofed beast loping down the stone path towards our family homestead,…

Can we protect privacy in a cashless society?

The key is to find digital mediums of exchange that preserve the distinct attributes of cash

Can we protect privacy in a cashless society?Canada leads the world in the transition to digitized commerce. With more than two credit cards per capita, the cashless economy is approaching swiftly. The move has been largely voluntary, driven by convenience, and half of Canadians favour dispensing with notes and coins altogether. With cash-only businesses declining to near non-existence, what’s the problem? As…

Backdoor access to encryption threatens the privacy of us all

Will government agencies respect our privacy and work in our best interests? Will access fall into the wrong hands?

Backdoor access to encryption threatens the privacy of us allCanada's spy agencies want access to your encrypted communication – and they have a ploy to get it without going through Parliament. Australia is where the action is taking place, since that country has fewer constitutional protections for privacy. The 2018 Assistance and Access Bill would force tech companies such as Wickr and Telegram to…

Broadcasting our private lives, one hack at a time

Through a combination of cyber laziness, poor practices by vendors and manufacturers and lax security, we're all exposed

Broadcasting our private lives, one hack at a timeWithin the traditionally sacred walls of our homes, we felt safe from prying eyes. Once the curtains were drawn and the doors shut, we felt we could say and do things we might not in public. But are we really alone? The revelation that a Russian-based website is streaming live video from thousands of security…

Building Internet walls to protect data could penalize users

There are billions of Internet users and every corporation has a virtual finger in the pie. But privacy laws differ widely

Building Internet walls to protect data could penalize usersGeneral data protection regulations (GDPR) sound like something that the average person needs to know nothing about. On the contrary, these rules affect us on a day-to-day basis. For the last 20 years, most jurisdictions have had similar requirements regarding corporations maintaining the privacy of their consumers’ data. The differences were more to do with…

Antiquated privacy laws fail to protect Canadians

Government must update legislation in a way that addresses today's technology and prepares for future changes. And political parties can't be exempt

Antiquated privacy laws fail to protect CanadiansBy Sen. Art Eggleton and Sen. Raymonde Saint-Germain Contributors Canadians are concerned about the protection of their private data, according to a 2016 Survey of Canadians on Privacy undertaken by the privacy commissioner of Canada. A reported 90 per cent of Canadians expressed some level of concern about data privacy and 74 per cent of Canadians felt…

Is Google stealing your garden furniture?

Violations of personal privacy occur on a much larger scale than anyone thought possible. But new EU rules address the problem

Is Google stealing your garden furniture?I first started to realize how dangerous social media was a few years ago. I was on the phone with a friend and I could feel his growing sense of outrage. “I can't believe it,” he said. “Google is reading my mail. They targeted me with ads that could only have come from specific words…