Helping women with Type 1 diabetes live longer, healthier lives

For one research participant, the study taught her how to take care of her own health

Helping women with Type 1 diabetes live longer, healthier lives“You’re stronger than you think,” said diabetes researcher Jane Yardley, as she clinked the 306-pound (138-kg) weight into place on the calf raise machine at the University of Alberta’s Physical Activity and Diabetes Lab. Surprising myself about how much weight I can lift is just one of the personal takeaways I’ve gained as a participant…

Five ways women can champion their own health

International Women’s Day encourages everyone to ‘Break the Bias’ in health care and research

Five ways women can champion their own healthIf you are a woman – or love one – here are some facts that may surprise you: Almost three-quarters of the 750,000 Canadians who have Alzheimer’s are women. Women are 20 per cent more likely than men to develop lung cancer if they smoke the same number of cigarettes. Heart attacks are not recognized…

Five things all women should know about their hearts

Women face risks and causes of heart disease that men don’t

Five things all women should know about their heartsFive times more women die from heart disease than from breast cancer. Yet many women don’t realize that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of premature death for women in Canada. Although treatments and outcomes of cardiovascular diseases are known to be different between men and women, women continue to be underdiagnosed, undertreated, undersupported and…

COVID-19 underscores ‘invisible pandemic’ of diet-related diseases

Public policies can help support better individual choices

COVID-19 underscores ‘invisible pandemic’ of diet-related diseasesThe COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light both weaknesses and opportunities in the way public policies can support children’s long-term health, according to the seventh and final Alberta Nutrition Report Card on Food Environments for Children and Youth, released recently. “Kids eat what’s available to them, what’s affordable and readily accessible,” said principal investigator Kim…

Senate must finish the job it started to help Canada’s kids

The Senate has delayed for eight months its final vote on restrictions to food marketing to children

Senate must finish the job it started to help Canada’s kidsBy Peter Mansbridge and Yves Savoie “Delay always breeds danger; and to protract a great design is often to ruin it.” Miguel de Cervantes put this astute observation in the mouth of his most famous literary character, Don Quixote. Though written more than 400 years ago, the lesson applies very well right now to the…

The Senate at its best – and worst – in the fight to protect children

How Canada's upper house can work across party lines and stop the marketing of junk food to kids

The Senate at its best – and worst – in the fight to protect childrenBy Tom Warshawski Childhood Obesity Foundation and Yves Savoie Heart & Stroke The crops grown by Canadian farmers and the livestock they raise are of the highest quality. In many cases, however, when these healthy foods are industrially processed, harmful amounts of salt, sugar and saturated fat are added. Consumption of excessive quantities of these…

Canada’s Food Guide is a good first step but more must be done

We need clear warning labels on the front of unhealthy food products and legislation that protects children from marketing

Canada’s Food Guide is a good first step but more must be doneBy Andrew Pipe and Yves Savoie Heart & Stroke The new Canada’s Food Guide has the potential to help challenge the impact of diet on Canadians’ health. But more must be done to realize that potential. The updated version of this vital document, the first such major change to the Food Guide since 2007, has been…