Canada’s labour markets weaker than federal government suggests

Every Canadian province significantly underperformed relative to U.S. states – they all rank in the bottom half

Canada’s labour markets weaker than federal government suggestsBy Charles Lammam and Brennan Sorge The Fraser Institute Touting Canada’s relatively low unemployment rate is a common refrain from the current federal government. For instance, Finance Minister Bill Morneau repeatedly states that “Canada’s unemployment rate is now the lowest it's been in over 40 years” and “these are the real results of a plan…

A tale of two cities and their wildly different spending habits

Vancouver taxes and spends far more than neighbouring Surrey. But do Vancouverites get value for their greater investment?

A tale of two cities and their wildly different spending habitsBy Josef Filipowicz and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute With three levels of government delivering a wide array of services to British Columbians – paid for by an equally wide array of taxes, fees and transfers – it can be difficult for citizens to understand and assess government taxation and spending – especially at city…

Ontario workers have little to celebrate this Labour Day

The problems are widespread: a low private-sector employment rate, too many part-time jobs, below average productivity

Ontario workers have little to celebrate this Labour DayBy Charles Lammam and Brennan Sorge The Fraser Institute Labour Day is a time to celebrate workers. Unfortunately, when you compare Ontario’s labour market to other North American jurisdictions over the past three years, Ontarians have little to cheer about. Premier Doug Ford’s government has an opportunity to help turn things around. But it will…

Alberta’s job recovery brings its own set of problems

Instead of a recovering private sector economy, Alberta has simply expanded its government sector

Alberta’s job recovery brings its own set of problemsBy Charles Lammam and Brennan Sorge The Fraser Institute Premier Rachel Notley’s government has repeatedly pointed to total employ­ment figures as a sign that Alberta has recovered from the recent recession. For instance, the premier recently said “our economy is recovering … and created 90,000 new jobs last year.” But to better understand the state…

Average workers will ultimately pay B.C.’s new payroll tax

Health tax will reduce wages and job opportunities, and further erode the province’s investment climate

Average workers will ultimately pay B.C.’s new payroll taxBy Charles Lammam and Taylor Jackson The Fraser Institute B.C. Finance Minister Carole James called Medical Services Plan (MSP) premiums “unfair” and argued in a news release that her government’s replacement Employer Health Tax (EHT) is a “much fairer and progressive approach.” More broadly, Premier John Horgan government’s rhetoric about the new tax suggests it…

Inflated employee pay at the heart of Alberta government’s debt

From wages to benefits to job security to early retirement, government employee compensation must be constrained

Inflated employee pay at the heart of Alberta government’s debtBy Charles Lammam and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute Alberta’s public finances are in rough shape. The government of Premier Rachel Notley expects to run another budget deficit this year (estimated at $8.8 billion) and has no plan to balance the books until at least 2023-24. Since 2014-15, the province has added more than $33…

Canada needs a bold response to U.S. business tax cuts

Reducing corporate taxes doesn’t distort economic decisions or add complexity to the tax system. It does spur the economy

Canada needs a bold response to U.S. business tax cutsBy Charles Lammam and Brennan Sorge The Fraser Institute According to a recent statement by Finance Minister Bill Morneau, the fall federal budget update will finally outline the government’s response to major business tax changes by the Trump administration in the United States. Unfortunately, Ottawa took a long time to even acknowledge we have a…

Ontario can spur entrepreneurship by cutting personal income taxes

To stop the decline in entrepreneurship in the province, Ontario must refrain from further increases in the province’s top income tax rate

Ontario can spur entrepreneurship by cutting personal income taxesBy Ergete Ferede and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship remains a vital source of innovation, which helps grow economies and provide employment opportunities for Ontarians. Unfortunately, several recent studies have found fewer businesses are being started in Ontario (and Canada as a whole), pointing a long-term decline in rates of entrepreneurship. This down­ward trend…

B.C. can spur entrepreneurship by cutting personal income taxes

The downward trend in entrepreneurship could have negative and widespread effects on B.C.’s economic well-being

B.C. can spur entrepreneurship by cutting personal income taxesBy Ergete Ferede and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship remains a vital source of innovation, which helps grow economies and provide employment opportunities for British Columbians. Unfortunately, several recent studies have found fewer businesses are being started in B.C. (and Canada as a whole), pointing a long-term decline in rates of entrepreneurship. This down­ward…

Alberta can spur entrepreneurship by cutting personal income taxes

To stop the decline in entrepreneurship in the province, Alberta must refrain from further increases in the province’s top income tax rate

Alberta can spur entrepreneurship by cutting personal income taxesBy Ergete Ferede and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship remains a vital source of innovation, which helps grow economies and provide employment opportunities for Albertans. Unfortunately, several recent studies have found fewer businesses are being started in Alberta (and Canada as a whole), pointing a long-term decline in rates of entrepreneurship. This down­ward trend…
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