Pandemic gives government perfect excuse to monitor us

Fear often trumps any proportionality or civil-liberties concern. After the virus passes, surveillance tools will remain

Pandemic gives government perfect excuse to monitor usCrises are the perfect breeding ground for authoritarians and social engineers. The extreme measures governments have rolled out to contain the COVID-19 pandemic remind us that fear often trumps any proportionality or civil-liberties concern. Since it originated in Wuhan, the crisis has exposed the spread and depth of the Communist Party of China’s mass-surveillance apparatus.…

How Canada can face down Chinese tyranny

China is trying to bend Canadian culture to its will. This will only get worse as Chinese economic clout grows in Canada

How Canada can face down Chinese tyrannyA Vancouver court is the battleground for two visions of Canada’s future. The United States wants the extradition of Meng Wanzhou, a top Huawei executive, while China wants Canada to let her go. As a matter of principle and strategy, Canada must stand up to Chinese imperialism by siding with the U.S.  The Huawei faceoff…

Canadian capital markets thrive without national regulator

Centralization undermines bottom-up co-ordination already underway between the provinces and territories

Canadian capital markets thrive without national regulatorAdvocates for centralized financial regulation have met their match in Canada. The nation is proof that competition between intranational jurisdictions can foster diverse, prosperous capital markets. In the research paper, The Federal Takeover of Canada’s Capital Markets, we argue the decades-long push for a national securities regulator is a solution in search of a problem.…

Internal trade barriers cripple Canada

The good news is the Constitution guarantees free trade among provinces. But do federal officials have the political will?

Internal trade barriers cripple CanadaIf there’s one near unanimous consensus among economists, it’s that free trade increases productivity and boosts growth. The flip side is that tariffs, quotas and other trade barriers generally reduce welfare. A recent study by the International Monetary Fund suggests Canada – on account of trade impediments between the provinces – is forgoing a four…

Canada missing out on shale revolution

Shale-gas policy changes, followed by investments across the country, would turn Canada into an international leader in the transition towards clean energy

Canada missing out on shale revolution“It takes real skill to derail an industry where Canada has so many competitive advantages,” writes Rick Rule regarding energy markets. The chief executive of Sprott US Holdings, a natural-resource brokerage, says the barrier is politics, while Canadian firms, technology and geology are top tier. Fortunately, policy can change and Canada can lead clean-energy production.…

Canada’s higher education system is in disarray

Mounting student debt and irrelevant fields of study have left us with a frustrated and unproductive young population

Canada’s higher education system is in disarrayLast summer, the federal government paid employers more than $200 million and up to 100 per cent of compensation to get them to hire students. If these young adults are Canada’s best and brightest – enjoying taxpayer-funded education – why are they so unappealing to employers that they have to be discounted to half price…

Alberta’s repeal of carbon tax makes economic, environmental sense

Over the course of a single year, the carbon tax cost each Albertan $286, couples $388 and couples with two children $508

Alberta’s repeal of carbon tax makes economic, environmental senseUtopian legislators in the United States often look with rose-tinted glasses upon the Canadian approach to everything, from higher education and medical care to global warming and international affairs. Since Canadians are the ones who live with such policies, they’re more inclined to recognize their mistakes and reverse the course, as exhibited by Alberta’s carbon…

There’s no free lunch when it comes to government spending

Modern monetary theory advocates argue the government should have a magic wand to conjure up money out of thin air.

Left to their own devices, politicos every now and then come up with a theory that allows them to promise free lunches. Modern monetary theory (MMT) is all the rage in the United States and Canada among starry-eyed social engineers who see no limits to their intervention. Rather than arising from academic inquiry, debates concerning…

Canadian drugs can’t cure deadly U.S. shortages

Canada can’t even keep itself stocked with necessary medication and falls far short when it comes to research spending

Canadian drugs can’t cure deadly U.S. shortagesCrippling drug prices in the United States have brought even Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and President Donald Trump together: they both favour drug imports from Canada to ease the pain. Vermont, Sanders’ home state, has approved this for state programs and 16 states are queuing up to follow suit. The proposal is seductive, a…
1 2 3 4