Mentorship programs for troubled youth foster respect for others

Canadian governments should be investing in youth mentorship programs to help build an inclusive, supportive and more progressive society

Mentorship programs for troubled youth foster respect for othersBy Suzanne Tough and Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary The youth of any society constitute the promise of the future – and many of our youth are in trouble. They’re growing up in a divided society. Ethnic, gender and political tensions are at seemingly combustible levels – not just south of the border but in Canada,…

The family that reads together, thrives together

Almost nine million Canadians can’t read well enough to perform everyday tasks. We need a cultural shift to a family-centred approach to literacy

The family that reads together, thrives togetherBy Erin Schryer Elementary Literacy Inc. and Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary Two out of five Canadian adults – nearly nine million people – can’t read well enough to perform everyday tasks. Reading difficulties start early. Children who aren’t reading well by the end of Grade 1 are never likely to read well. Reduced literacy…

When a new mom has disturbing thoughts about hurting her baby

Postpartum OCD is frequently misdiagnosed and misunderstood – but it is treatable, help is available

When a new mom has disturbing thoughts about hurting her babyBy Gina Wong Athabasca University and Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary In January of 2018, a new mother in California became part of a viral Facebook post that described her baby’s four-month postpartum checkup. As a result of the thoughts she shared with her health-care providers, the police were called and she was escorted to…

In a world of buzzword parenting, what’s a parent to do?

Well-known risk factors undermine children’s health and development, but there are protective factors you can employ

In a world of buzzword parenting, what’s a parent to do?Helicopter parenting. Tiger parenting. Free-range parenting. These are buzzwords we hear all the time that are supposed to describe the ‘best’ approaches for parents to take raising their children. We all want the best for our children, and parents happily and eagerly adopt the latest, greatest advice. Even governments enact legislation that promotes one approach…

Defusing the ticking time bomb of postpartum depression

The biggest predictors of postpartum depression are prenatal depression and a history of depression before conception

Defusing the ticking time bomb of postpartum depressionBy Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary and Cindy-Lee Dennis University of Toronto A distraught young mother from British Columbia recently took her own life while in the grip of postpartum depression, leaving behind a grieving husband and infant son. She was a registered nurse and had been seeking treatment for depression and anxiety. Tragically, the health-care system…

Why is it so hard for mothers to breastfeed in Canada?

Members of the public can help by supporting women’s right to breastfeed in public and demanding baby-friendly standards in health-care settings

Why is it so hard for mothers to breastfeed in Canada?By Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary and Mary Lougheed Calgary Breastfeeding Matters Group Foundation An Icelandic MP breastfed her baby while delivering a speech in parliament recently. No one reacted to her breastfeeding, because in Iceland, breastfeeding is the cultural norm. The mother stated this was the most natural thing in the world. If only that were the…

When inequality in Canada goes up, child well-being goes down

Record numbers of children in Canada are living in poverty in spite of an all-party resolution in 1989 to end child poverty by the year 2000

When inequality in Canada goes up, child well-being goes downBy Erin Schryer Elementary Literacy Inc. and Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary National Child Day has been celebrated across Canada every Nov. 20 since 1993 to commemorate the United Nations' adoption of two documents describing children's rights: the 1959 Declaration of the Rights of the Child and the 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child. Unfortunately, National…

Indigenous people are not the ‘ghosts of history’

By honouring treaties and the rights they bestow, Canada can go a long way toward restoring pride, respect and dignity to indigenous peoples

Indigenous people are not the ‘ghosts of history’By Leonard Flett Contributor with Nicole Letourneau University of Calgary Canadian indigenous people have been described as “ghosts of history.” To a great extent, they have been ignored, even though Canadians are fully aware that indigenous people were here long before Europeans. Canadians know that indigenous people have been mistreated – their lands and culture stripped…