Stemming the demographic tide on U.S. entrepreneurship

Policy levers exist that can improve entrepreneurial incentives and increase the chances of successful new business startups

Stemming the demographic tide on U.S. entrepreneurshipBy Steven Globerman and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship is part of the American DNA and broadly recognized as the basis for improved living standards through innovation and technological progress. Unfortunately, policy-makers in Washington and across the country, and average Americans more broadly, seem unaware of the decline in entrepreneurship over the past two…

How to spur entrepreneurship in an aging population

Policy levers can strengthen incentives for entrepreneurship and improve the likelihood of successful new business startups

How to spur entrepreneurship in an aging populationBy Steven Globerman and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship is widely acknowledged as the basis for innovation, technological advancement and economic progress – and, subsequently, a driving force for improved living standards. Yet there’s little discussion, let alone action, among governments in Canada to stem the adverse effects of demographic change on entrepreneurship, specifically…

Entrepreneurship is at the heart of economic growth

The rate of small-business startups is declining in Canada. Here's what we can do to spur risk takers, who help reshape an economy

Entrepreneurship is at the heart of economic growthBy Jason Clemens and Steven Globerman The Fraser Institute The ability to increase living standards primarily comes down to one thing: being more productive. Individuals and societies can only improve living standards if they become more efficient. Entrepreneurship is essential to this process of transforming inputs such as labour and raw materials into desired outputs.…

How do we address Canada’s scarcity of doctors?

Greater use could be made of nurse practitioners and physician assistants, including for relatively uncomplicated medical procedures

How do we address Canada’s scarcity of doctors?While health care is a dynamic service characterized by the continual introduction of new drugs and medical devices, physicians remain at the centre of health-care delivery. So it’s worth noting that Canada lags well behind almost all developed countries in the availability of physician services. Canada ranks 29th out of 33 high-income countries for the number…

Canada should accept increased competition under new NAFTA

The U.S. administration is actually acting as a champion of the Canadian consumer

Canada should accept increased competition under new NAFTAThe U.S. administration tipped its hand ahead of this week’s NAFTA negotiations in Washington, D.C. A report released by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative last month set out, in broad strokes, the administration’s negotiating strategy. Not surprisingly, the overriding objective is to improve market access for U.S. exports in the agriculture, manufacturing and…

CRTC at a crossroads

The CRTC will either have to start regulating streaming services or desist from regulating the broadcasting sector

CRTC at a crossroadsThe regulation of Canada’s broadcasting sector by the CRTC is at a crossroads. Technological change, especially the proliferation of streaming video over the Internet, or so-called over-the-top (OTT) broadcasting, is seriously challenging the viability of the regulatory model that’s been in place for decades. The government has recognized the challenges posed by ongoing technological developments…

Subsidizing high-speed telecommunications services isn’t necessary

The CRTC hopes to identify what telecommunications services are necessary for all Canadians, along with how to fund them

Subsidizing high-speed telecommunications services isn’t necessaryThe CRTC is in the midst of a review of basic telecommunications services in Canada, which includes public hearings due to begin in April. As part of the review, the regulator hopes to identify what telecommunications services are necessary for all Canadians and the means to fund universal access to those services deemed necessary. Current…

Patient user fees are compatible with universal health care

It’s no coincidence that countries with cost-sharing programs in place have waiting times significantly shorter than those in Canada

Patient user fees are compatible with universal health careA prominent feature of Canada’s health-care system, as mandated by the Canada Health Act, is the absence of any charge for publicly insured health-care services at the point of consumption. Unfortunately, this has led to the mistaken notion that such “first dollar coverage” is a necessary component of universal coverage for health-care services. In fact,…