Alberta sweeps away energy industry roadblocks

Alberta sweeps away energy industry roadblocksBy Jairo Yunis and Steven Globerman The Fraser Institute The Alberta government recently introduced Bill 22 (the Red Tape Reduction Implementation Act), delivering on a campaign promise to streamline regulations across the provincial government. While details aren’t yet clear, the bill proposes a whopping 14 legislative changes across six ministries. Proposed changes include removing residency…

Alberta needs to reform energy regulations

Alberta needs to reform energy regulationsBy Steven Globerman and Jairo Yunis The Fraser Institute The Alberta government recently announced cuts to scores of jobs at the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER), including operations staff, headquarter managers and field workers, as part of a major reorganization. The ostensible goal is to make the AER more efficient, effective and resilient by simplifying the…

Rethink restrictions on private health insurance

Rethink restrictions on private health insuranceIn its sole reliance on government providing first-dollar coverage of medically necessary services, Canada’s health-care system is unique among high-income countries with universal health care. It also offers inferior service as a result. Virtually all high-income countries – including Australia, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands – allow residents to use private insurance to pay for…

CRTC at a crossroads

The CRTC will either have to start regulating streaming services or desist from regulating the broadcasting sector

CRTC at a crossroadsThe regulation of Canada’s broadcasting sector by the CRTC is at a crossroads. Technological change, especially the proliferation of streaming video over the Internet, or so-called over-the-top (OTT) broadcasting, is seriously challenging the viability of the regulatory model that’s been in place for decades. The government has recognized the challenges posed by ongoing technological developments…

Subsidizing high-speed telecommunications services isn’t necessary

The CRTC hopes to identify what telecommunications services are necessary for all Canadians, along with how to fund them

Subsidizing high-speed telecommunications services isn’t necessaryThe CRTC is in the midst of a review of basic telecommunications services in Canada, which includes public hearings due to begin in April. As part of the review, the regulator hopes to identify what telecommunications services are necessary for all Canadians and the means to fund universal access to those services deemed necessary. Current…

Patient user fees are compatible with universal health care

It’s no coincidence that countries with cost-sharing programs in place have waiting times significantly shorter than those in Canada

Patient user fees are compatible with universal health careA prominent feature of Canada’s health-care system, as mandated by the Canada Health Act, is the absence of any charge for publicly insured health-care services at the point of consumption. Unfortunately, this has led to the mistaken notion that such “first dollar coverage” is a necessary component of universal coverage for health-care services. In fact,…