Nutrition researcher gets funding to find out why diet affects immunity

Immunology is at the centre of virtually every chronic disease

Nutrition researcher gets funding to find out why diet affects immunityTwo decades ago, Catherine Field’s University of Alberta nutrition lab showed that specific fatty acids in breast milk during the crucial first period of life could program how the immune system responds to food allergens. Her group looked at milk, egg and soy allergies – the ones babies tend to grow out of but can still…

Caesarean birth, prolonged labour influence childhood health: study

U of A researchers identify specific bacteria linked with changes in gut microbiome of infants

Caesarean birth, prolonged labour influence childhood health: studyEvents at birth may affect the microbes living in a baby's gut during the first few months of life, leading to a higher risk of childhood obesity and allergies, according to a new study published in the journal Gastroenterology. The researchers used data from the CHILD Cohort Study (CHILD) to look at the complex relationships between birth events, a…

Living close to green space benefits gut bacteria of infants: study

First study of its kind shows formula-fed babies’ gut microbiomes more like those of breastfed babies when they live near natural environments

Living close to green space benefits gut bacteria of infants: studyLiving close to natural green space can mitigate some of the changes in infant gut bacteria associated with formula feeding, according to new research published in the journal Environment International. “Not every infant can be breastfed,” said Anita Kozyrskyj, pediatrics professor at the University of Alberta. “This is one of the first pieces of evidence for a nature-related…

Asthma, allergies more common in ‘night owl’ teens: study

Disruptions to melatonin may be the link, researchers suggest

Asthma, allergies more common in ‘night owl’ teens: studyTeenagers who prefer to stay up late at night and sleep in late the next day are more likely to develop asthma and allergies than their “early bird” counterparts, according to new research. “Compared to the morning type, those who go to bed late have approximately three times higher risk of developing asthma,” said principal…