It’s time Canada stopped protecting its dairy industry

Governments tend to forget about consumers when managing supply. Open trade to more cheese and challenge our farmers

It’s time Canada stopped protecting its dairy industryCheese heads – it’s what Canadians are called in many of the United States border regions. It’s because when many Canadians visit their American neighbours, they head straight to the nearest supermarket and buy cheese – and milk and eggs. Dairy and eggs are much more expensive in Canada than in the U.S., even when…

Canada’s future brighter with broader trade

We are too dependent on two of our top three customers: the U.S. and China. And both of these are increasingly hostile

Canada’s future brighter with broader tradeCanada relies on exports. In any given year, about 45 per cent of our economy is in foreign trade. For much of the past, our exports have been mainly in the agriculture and resources sectors. These are still important, but services (think international education), manufactured goods (e.g. Lululemon clothing) and technology (e.g. the Canadarm robotic…

Canada missing out on natural gas boom – again

The opposition to fossil fuels such as natural gas is driven by magical thinking and is against all empirical evidence

Canada missing out on natural gas boom – againBy Mark Milke and Lennie Kaplan Canadian Energy Centre As the lockdown from the COVID-19 pandemic ends, provincial and federal governments will still face the reality that arrived in its wake: a recession, and one made worse by a domestic energy sector that never really recovered from multiple injuries already in play. Those injuries included:…

Nationalism should be at the core of Canada’s identity

As the COVID-19 crisis has shown, open borders mean diseases travel more rapidly and supply chains are endangered

Nationalism should be at the core of Canada’s identityPope Francis recently praised attachment to one’s own culture and place. He criticized global capitalism with its “consumerist vision of human beings” for its “levelling effect on cultures, diminishing the immense variety which is the heritage of all humanity.” But in Canada, nationalism – the idea that one should have particular regard for one’s own…

Bold action needed to repair Canada’s economy

In the post-COVID-19 era, government needs to invest in game-changing projects. Here are some good places to start

Bold action needed to repair Canada’s economyThe clamour to reopen the economy has reached a crescendo in many parts of North America. But the global economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic will be far-reaching for years to come. Canadian historians list 1935 as the year the worst of the Great Depression was over. But the nation really didn’t begin to return…

Reaching into the past for a better pandemic supply plan

Some vital economic sectors require government support and protection in order to grow and mature and not be held hostage to foreign influence

Reaching into the past for a better pandemic supply planAn old and obscure economic theory should have shaped the Canadian response to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Sometimes we need to go back to find the right path forward. The infant industry argument was first proposed by Alexander Hamilton in 1791. He made a case for the United States government to protect fledgling industries against…

The Year 1000: a look at globalization’s roots

Author Valerie Hansen demonstrates that the concept of international trading networks and linkages goes back a very long way

The Year 1000: a look at globalization’s rootsValerie Hansen is an American academic who teaches history at Yale. She also writes books, of which 2012’s The Silk Road is perhaps the best known. Hansen’s latest book is The Year 1000. Provocatively subtitled When Explorers Connected the World – and Globalization Began, it’s a recounting of interconnectedness in the five centuries between 1000…

Covid-19 has ended the era of single-source suppliers

Covid-19 has ended the era of single-source suppliersThe pendulum of public attention is beginning to swing from getting through the pandemic to economic recovery. But recovery is not a simple process. Governments and health authorities are planning or actually beginning to implement the gradual and much-awaited loosening of lockdown restrictions. COVID-19 is nowhere near being vanquished and it will still be a…

Recalibrating globalization in a pandemic age

Who defines what’s essential and should thus be sourced domestically, even if it’s more expensive to do so?

Recalibrating globalization in a pandemic ageAutarky is an uncommon word that’s become a lot more common lately. It defines the extent to which a country chooses to be self-sufficient, thereby abjuring international trade. Typically, autarky is seen as an impoverishing thing. And it usually is. But in the current debate, it’s a red herring of the highest order. In order…

COVID-19 will prompt a rethink of globalization

In the wake of COVID-19, we need to reconfigure our economy and society so they are less vulnerable to external shocks

COVID-19 will prompt a rethink of globalizationAmerican historian Frank Snowden pulls no punches. He says the “coronavirus is emphatically a disease of globalization.” And the most severe blows strike at cities that are “densely populated and linked by rapid air travel, by movements of tourists, of refugees, all kinds of businesspeople, all kinds of interlocking networks.” In this respect, the virus…
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