Six University of Alberta students to receive the Schulich Leader Scholarship

Schulich Leaders put their love of technology to work solving problems

Six University of Alberta students to receive the Schulich Leader ScholarshipKevin Uzomechine says his fascination with technology began as a youngster transfixed by the brief static blue text on his TV set that read “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.” By the time the large blocks of unabashed yellow text had crawled vertically up through the screen to Star Wars’ signature trumpets, the…

Simulated, anonymized data could be key to health-care innovations

Synthetic data based on records ensures confidentiality

Simulated, anonymized data could be key to health-care innovationsA University of Alberta researcher is developing an inventive solution to a problem plaguing health-care research around the world: how to make data-driven decisions without compromising the privacy of personal medical records. Dean Eurich, professor in the School of Public Health, is academic lead on a project that has successfully created a “synthetic data” set that…

Space designers take flight to test bioengineered knee cartilage in low gravity

Device built by U of A team could help researchers learn how osteoarthritis develops

Space designers take flight to test bioengineered knee cartilage in low gravityMembers of a University of Alberta student club are walking on air after testing samples of bioengineered knee cartilage in a reduced-gravity experiment competition. Amira Aissiou and Kirtan Dhunnoo of the University of Alberta Space Design Group strapped themselves in and went for a wild ride in the Canadian Space Agency’s Falcon 20 parabolic aircraft to get a…

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of Canada

Innovators in women and children’s health, water safety, nutrition and archeology join ranks

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of CanadaWhy some are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease than others, even when taking into account life-modifying factors like smoking and exercise, boils down to developmental aspects that start in the womb, according to a global authority on vascular pathophysiology in the pregnancy complication of pre-eclampsia. “It sets the stage,” said Sandra Davidge, Distinguished University Professor in…

AI used to help patients with respiratory issues

Wearable technology could get ahead of hospital admissions by predicting respiratory flare-ups

AI used to help patients with respiratory issuesA new University of Alberta feasibility study involving 40 patients could help those dealing with long-term chronic respiratory issues by using new wearable technology and artificial intelligence to monitor symptoms and warn of coming exacerbation episodes. ADAMM-RSM is a wearable device developed in the U.S. for patients with asthma, with the goal of expanding its…

How the free market is driving an energy evolution

Things are changing faster, and for the better, than radical environmentalists recognize or acknowledge

How the free market is driving an energy evolutionA recent Globe and Mail story about a firm developing garbage-to-biodiesel technology shows how continuing progress makes the global warming extremists’ most hysterically apocalyptic predictions, and their extreme absolutist ‘solutions,’ not only grossly wrong but already likely obsolete. In the case of the company profiled, Cielo Waste Solutions Corp. is able to transform not just…

Robotics, AI key to faster cardiac ultrasound system under development

U of A cardiologist teams up with computer scientists, engineers to create 3-D heart imaging device

Robotics, AI key to faster cardiac ultrasound system under developmentA University of Alberta-based team is developing a system to improve the way heart conditions are diagnosed by blending robotics and artificial intelligence with existing cardiac ultrasound technology. “Current echocardiography (heart ultrasound) is used for virtually all patients with cardiac symptoms, but it has limitations. For example, it doesn’t typically capture the entire heart in…

The fight against future pandemics must be proactive

Instead of playing catch-up with the next virus, precision medicine lets us deal with it swiftly

The fight against future pandemics must be proactiveOn March 17, David Wishart, ’83 BSc (Hons), fielded a call from Medellin, Colombia. A company called Quantrack had a job for him. The novel COVID‑19 coronavirus had its hooks in the country. The Quantrack team figured that if Wishart, a professor of both biology and computing science, could make one of his famous heat…

The future of farming is smarter

In the drive to become more efficient and adaptive, farms are becoming innovation incubators

The future of farming is smarterThe future of farming might bring tiny drone pollinators or a fishy foray into conserving water in greenhouses. It might bring an app that diagnoses plant disease, artificial intelligence that reduces a farmer’s driving time, or robotics that lend some extra hands. Future farming might bring some, all or none of those. What it will…

New laser equipment gives medical technology developers a boost

Microfabrication tools allow inventors to design and test precision medical devices at rapid speeds

New laser equipment gives medical technology developers a boostIn the world of precision medicine, really, really small is a really big deal. That’s certainly the case for western Canadian entrepreneurs who have big ideas for tiny medical devices, thanks to a new investment from Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) in a University of Alberta facility. Medical device developers now have access to $1.5 million in…
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