Any pension fund fiasco is one too many

The plight of Sears pensioners has once again ignited calls for change but the federal government seems content to sit on its hands

Any pension fund fiasco is one too manyThe demise of Sears Canada has seen 16,000 employees lose their jobs. It’s unfortunate, but inevitable, as online giants Amazon and Alibaba transform the retail universe. But what shouldn’t be inevitable is the loss of pension benefits for those employees and another 18,000 Sears retirees. If the 2009 bankruptcy of tech giant Nortel is a…

Unplugged from the reality of our energy needs

The green movement’s fossil-fuel divestment crusade hurts the poor and middle class

Unplugged from the reality of our energy needsIf you ever wonder how academics and activists combine to end up utopian, anti-poor and anti-middle class all at once, look no further than calls for savings and pension divestment from Canadian oil and gas companies. One academic from Toronto’s Ryerson University wrote of how “we are facing an impending disaster” from fossil fuels. The professor had…

CPP reforms need a complete rethink

The 2016 CPP reforms were solutions in search of a problem – and don’t even solve the imagined problem

CPP reforms need a complete rethinkBy Jason Clemens and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) needs a comprehensive review, followed by real reform. The provincial and federal finance ministers said recently they will re-examine certain aspects of the CPP reforms agreed to in late 2016. But they will avoid a larger re-evaluation of the efficacy of an expanded CPP. Clearly,…

Who benefits from an expanded CPP?

The government? Likely. High earners? Definitely. Middle-income earners? Unlikely. Low-income workers may even see a reduction in overall benefits

Who benefits from an expanded CPP?As recently as June 2016, the federal and provincial finance ministers agreed to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). It's so recent, in government terms, that many of the details of benefit entitlements, costs and investment criteria still aren’t known. But it’s been long enough for deep thinkers on matters of social security to delve…

Expanding the CPP unnecessary and counterproductive

A crude instrument such as expanding the CPP will do nothing to help those seniors most in need

Expanding the CPP unnecessary and counterproductiveBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute In a recent op-ed on Troy Media, respected actuary Robert Brown responded to our criticism of the federal government’s case for expanding the Canada Pension Plan. While we’re pleased Mr. Brown has engaged collegially – in fact, he acknowledged our analysis is accurate – a rejoinder is…

We really do need an expanded Canada Pension Plan

A significant proportion of future Canadian retirees are going to suffer measurable deterioration in their standards of living

We really do need an expanded Canada Pension PlanThe case for an expanded Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is all about providing secure retirement income. The Fraser Institute recently argued that the federal government has failed to make a convincing case for CPP expansion. But any perspective depends heavily on trying to determine how much income Canadians need to retire with dignity. Do we require 50…

Feds fail to make convincing case for CPP expansion

The analysis leading to the conclusion that the Canada Pension Plan needs to be expanded falls short of a convincing argument

Feds fail to make convincing case for CPP expansionBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute The Trudeau government recently introduced legislation to expand the Canada Pension Plan – a move that will require working Canadians to pay higher payroll taxes in exchange for increased benefits in retirement. The government’s case for expansion rests on a claim that nearly one in four…

Return on CPP contributions still meagre after expansion

Younger Canadians especially will continue to receive a meagre return

Return on CPP contributions still meagre after expansionBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute The expansion of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), announced in June by Canada’s federal and provincial finance ministers, has sparked important questions about what the changes will mean for individual Canadians. And rightfully so given that the CPP is one of the key pillars of our…

What middle class tax cut?

Trudeau government fails to deliver on its middle class tax cut promise

What middle class tax cut?By Charles Lammam Ben Eisen and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute On the campaign trail, the Liberals promised to cut taxes for middle-class Canadians to ensure that “middle-class Canadians have money in their pockets to save, invest and grow the economy.” Once elected, the Liberals did reduce the income tax rate on the second-lowest federal…

The good, the bad and the ugly of an expanded CPP

The good, the bad and the ugly of an expanded CPPAmazingly, eight of 10 provincial finance ministers and the federal government have agreed to a modest increase in the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). The two provinces which have not signed on are Manitoba, where the government is only four weeks old, and Quebec, which has chosen to allow itself the option of adopting a differing…