Venezuela’s descent into chaos was predictable

Taking wealth from one group and giving it to others just creates misery and strife

Venezuela’s descent into chaos was predictableNicolas Maduro was recently sworn in as president of Venezuela for a second six-year term. There are no signs things will improve in the strife-torn nation during this term. His first term was marked by hyperinflation, violent repression, flight of foreign investors, shutdown of businesses, bankruptcies, riots, food shortages, mass unemployment, widespread hunger, emigration of…

Are NDP supporters getting fed up with Jagmeet Singh?

The federal leader seems unaware of key issues. That can hardly give party supporters confidence in his abilities

Are NDP supporters getting fed up with Jagmeet Singh?In only a couple of minutes, Jagmeet Singh showed why he’s not going to last in federal politics. The federal NDP leader had an interview on CTV’s Question Period with host Evan Solomon on Sunday. Near the end of their discussion, Solomon asked him about a Jan. 9 Hill Times opinion piece written by Lu…

The abysmal scorecard of socialist revolutions

Real communism has failed repeatedly to provide better living conditions. Why do countries like Venezuela persist?

The abysmal scorecard of socialist revolutionsNineteen years ago, ex-general Hugo Chavez came into power in Venezuela, vowing that a “Bolivarian revolution” based on communist principles would improve the lives of his people. Today, millions of Venezuelans are fleeing their homes looking for food, medicine or employment in neighbouring countries. Inflation is out of control. In a country with perhaps the…

Left-wing social justice warriors rewriting history

It is important that we understand history as it was, and not how some of us wish it would be

Left-wing social justice warriors rewriting historyThe philosopher George Santayana famously wrote in The Life of Reason: The Phases of Human Progress: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”  This statement makes sense, especially in light of our society’s recent trials of history – and the accuracy of history being placed on trial. The first example involves Scott…

The People’s Party of the left … right … whatever

This new party has a leader who wasn't elected and few members. It appears intended simply to soothe Bernier’s fragile ego

The People’s Party of the left … right … whateverWhen Maxime Bernier, a former Conservative cabinet minister and federal leadership candidate, abruptly quit the party last month, he announced he would be starting a new political party. Well, the nameless entity with one public face was finally given an identity on Sept. 14: the People’s Party of Canada. He couldn’t have made a worse…

Priming the pump of bad incentives in Canada

The nationalization of a project with massive profit potential like Trans Mountain is an admission that Canada’s regulatory system is badly – if not entirely – broken

Priming the pump of bad incentives in CanadaThe decision to nationalize the Trans Mountain pipeline is not a victory, it’s a failure. Back in April, Kinder Morgan announced it was halting all “non-essential” operations on its Trans Mountain expansion pipeline project pending an establishment of certainty that the project would continue despite entrenched opposition by the British Columbia government. In a news…

B.C. closing doors to investment

Government policies mean the province is gaining an international reputation as a place where major projects can’t get done

B.C. closing doors to investmentBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute More British Columbians think the province is on the wrong track than the right one, according to a new Angus Reid poll. And there’s good reason to be concerned about B.C.’s policy direction. Since assuming office last year, Premier John Horgan’s government has done little to…

Marxism “the opium of the intellectuals”

On the 200th anniversary of Marx's birth, let's admit Marxism has nothing useful to say to the modern world

Marxism “the opium of the intellectuals”Karl Marx is buried in England, in the north London suburb of Highgate. I know that because I came across his grave in the summer of 1964. Topped by a large bronze bust on a marble pedestal, the tomb is hard to miss. And although you might think of Marx as a quaint figure, you’d…

Self-inflicted socialist wounds crippling Canada’s economy

Justin Trudeau has Canada headed toward another fiscal calamity, through a series of policy decisions that mimic his father’s misguided choices

Self-inflicted socialist wounds crippling Canada’s economyLike father, like son, the old adage goes. It’s never been truer than in the case of former prime minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau and his son Justin, Canada’s current prime minister. The parallels start with an ideological attraction to communism. Pierre was asked for his views on democracy and communism, and stated that a one-party…

When an intellectual cozies up to dictators

Is it feasible to separate political views and private behaviour from artistic merit? George Bernard Shaw is a perfect case study

When an intellectual cozies up to dictatorsTo most Canadians, George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) may be a quaint figure whose primary distinction is having a popular southern Ontario theatre festival named after him. However, he was a big wheel during the first half of the 20th century. A self-described “downstart,” Shaw was born into an impecunious Protestant Ascendancy family in Dublin, Ireland. Leaving…