There is a high cost to workplace deception

Build a culture of candor by expecting your people to be honest, to communicate openly and to treat people nicely

There is a high cost to workplace deceptionLies in the workplace are expensive. According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, a typical organization loses five per cent of its revenue to fraud – a potential global loss of $3.5 trillion dollars. But the cost of out-and-out fraud pales in comparison to the monumental cost of the erosion of trust that occurs…

There’s no taboo to social lying

Too often, the truth can set you free – from jobs, relationships, money and social opportunities

There’s no taboo to social lyingThe first thing to remember in this day of mass media saturation is that there are no great lies – if something is repeated often enough it becomes the truth. That being said, the ultimate great lie is that it is always better to tell the truth. There are needful lies; lies of omission, white…

Hijab hoax story could have unfortunate long-term consequences

The fact that a child lied is not the story. The fact that those in authority accepted, and publicized, an 11-year-old girl's story without checking the facts is

Hijab hoax story could have unfortunate long-term consequencesThere have been stories of adults and children lying to the public about everything from getting robbed to being raped. The ruse Canadians just experienced could leave a bad taste in our mouths for some time. On Jan. 12, the Toronto Police Service’s Twitter feed reported an attack at Pauline Johnson Junior Public School by…

Why it’s hard to spot a liar

Most of the observable signs of lying (helping to spot a liar) are dependent on the liar feeling a negative emotional arousal and an uncomfortable sense of conflict

Why it’s hard to spot a liarA short time after The Truth About Lies in the Workplace was published, I received this email: I had just begun reading your book, and had gotten to the part about body language signs that point to someone who is lying when I was confronted with a real life situation. A parcel (that was meant…

6 reasons we suck at spotting liars

The best way of countering liars is to follow the old adage “trust, but verify”

6 reasons we suck at spotting liarsRecognizing that we are being lied to is an important social and business skill. But surprisingly small factors about someone, – where we meet them, what they wear, what their voices sound like, whether their posture mimics ours, if they mention the names of people we know or admire – can enhance their credibility to…

There is little that is new about fake news

Once upon a time, a news story wasn't news until a legitimate news outlet carried it. Now, if it’s on somebody’s Twitter feed it’s a news story

There is little that is new about fake newsPORTLAND, Ore. Feb. 9, 2017/ Troy Media/ – The U.S. news media tells us the world is awash in fake news. Democrats blame it for the defeat of their candidate, Hillary Clinton, in the U.S. presidential elections. President Donald Trump rails against “fake news” from the “dishonest media,” singling out CNN. Facebook and Google, both…

A candid and honest politician. Is that too much to ask?

Trudeau continues to struggle with his facts, telling one part of the country one thing and another part something quite different

A candid and honest politician. Is that too much to ask?CALGARY, Alta. Jan. 18, 2017/ Troy Media/ - In politics, lying is in. I know. I know. You could dig into history and argue that it’s always been in. But, right now, it appears to be front and centre, thanks in large part to that guy in the country south of us whose name I’d…

Living in the post-truth world, energy style

Post-truth nonsense about fossil fuels paints a dangerous, damaging and distorted picture of Canada's energy use and production

Living in the post-truth world, energy styleOne of the unfortunate legacies of 2016 is the frequency of ‘post-truth’ communications. The term describes communications where objective facts are replaced by erroneous assertions aimed at creating emotion-based beliefs. Post-truth communications reached a peak during the American presidential campaign. But Canadians have also seen an escalation of post-truth communications, particularly in relation to energy.…