Evidence clear: Minimum wage hikes hurt most vulnerable

University of Waterloo study confirms that the young and immigrants lose out on jobs when minimum wage rises

Evidence clear: Minimum wage hikes hurt most vulnerableBy Charles Lammam, Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute With many of Canada’s largest provinces (Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia) either committing to or considering a minimum wage of $15 per hour, many analysts – including us – note that this policy will hurt many vulnerable workers by reducing job opportunities. But in an open letter to Ontario…

Minimum wage prices low-skilled workers out of a job

Governments should abolish the fruitless minimum wage if they want to do right by young and low-income persons

Minimum wage prices low-skilled workers out of a jobBy Marco Navarro-Genie and Matthew Lau Contributors High unemployment in Atlantic Canada is a longstanding problem. For over four decades, unemployment rates have consistently exceeded the national rate. It is critical for the provinces to reduce barriers to work. Yet governments do the opposite when they raise the legislated minimum wage, as all four Maritime…

Ontario’s proposed labour law changes will hurt young workers the most

Canadian evidence consistently shows minimum wage hikes result in fewer job opportunities for inexperienced and low-skilled workers

By Charles Lammam, Hugh MacIntyre and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute The Ontario government recently proposed a series of changes to provincial labour laws, including a significant hike of the minimum wage to $15 per hour. But the proposed changes will hurt the vulnerable workers they’re meant to help. The proposal would increase the minimum wage from its current rate of…

Serving up an unpalatable minimum wage for the food industry

The effects of artificial intelligence and the rise of the digital world will force us to rethink how we produce, process and distribute food

Governments jumping on the $15-an-hour bandwagon are missing an opportunity to look at how the next technological revolution will affect our food systems. And that’s a shame. The minimum wage is rising in many parts of the country. Recently, Ontario announced it would raise its minimum wage to $15 an hour, to match Alberta. In…

Open trade will do more for the poor than a ‘living wage’

Free markets and open borders are what keep the costs of food and other goods that we buy down

It is only fair that in a nation as rich as ours, everyone should have a living income. Raising the minimum wage to $20.64 per hour, however, will not solve the poverty problem. That hourly wage is proposed by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and others. First, not all minimum wage earners live in…

Vancouver’s living wage of little help to vulnerable workers

Living wage laws tend to reduce employment opportunities for low-wage and low-skilled workers, and push up taxes

By Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute The City of Vancouver's plan to become a living wage employer will likely be a costly failure. Vancouver city council voted recently to make the city a living wage employer, and proponents claim this will help vulnerable workers. But the unfortunate reality is that the implemented policy will likely increase costs…

Faulty arguments underlie call for $15 wage

Raising the minimum wage is another example of the Notley government making things worse for the Alberta economy

Faulty arguments underlie call for $15 wageBy Charles Lammam Steve Lafleur and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute In a recent column in the Edmonton Journal, analysts from the Caledon Institute defended the Notley government’s plan to increase the provincial minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2018. While the column is riddled with factual errors and faulty arguments, the authors got one…

Misguided minimum wage policies hurt low-skilled workers

Most Canadians who earn the minimum wage are not “poor,” and most of the working poor earn more than the minimum wage

Misguided minimum wage policies hurt low-skilled workersBy Robert P. Murphy and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute Last year, every Canadian province except for New Brunswick (which has an increase planned for this year) hiked its minimum wage. And campaigns are underway, most notably in Alberta, to boost the wage floor further to $15 per hour. Such a policy appeals to many…

Premier Notley right to reconsider $15 minimum wage

Too much at stake for Alberta workers to enter the “uncharted waters” of a $15 minimum wage without assessing the potential dangers

Premier Notley right to reconsider $15 minimum wageBy Steve Lafleur and Hugh McIntyre The Fraser Institute In a recent interview, Premier Rachel Notley seemed to hint that the Government of Alberta could slow its plan to increase the minimum wage to $15 if the economy remains weak. The premier’s comments came one day after it was reported that an internal government briefing…

Raising the minimum wage comes at a cost of higher prices

Pressure is mounting on food chains to pay employees decent wages, which will hit consumers at the checkout counter

Raising the minimum wage comes at a cost of higher pricesMany have questioned Starbucks’ recent decision to raise its prices for most of its drinks (including its coveted Venti Lattes) because coffee futures have dropped and overall prices are down 42 per cent from late last year. Clearly motivated by its desire to increase revenue, this hike in prices, regardless of its motive, speaks volumes…